Hourly Updates: The Senate

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During the last two weeks of the session, The Missouri Times will be bringing you hourly updates of all floor activity of each chamber. Below is all the floor activity beginning in the Senate from Monday, May 1, and on.

Friday, May 12, 2017

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

  • Sen. Kehoe moves that the Senate be adjourned until May 22, 2017, at 11 a.m.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • Right at 4 p.m., the Senate votes to third read and pass the Senate substitute for HBs 1194 & 1193 by a vote of 23-10.
  • Now voting on the emergency clause – 23-9, the bill still needs to head to the House.

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues to stand at ease.
  • At 3:13 p.m. Sen. Gina Walsh rises for a motion, saying that for the Senate to stand at ease, the body must give consent. She moves that the Senate no longer stand at ease, and adjourn. Sen. Bob Onder says she is not recognized.
  • “We’re not going to follow the rules if you don’t follow the rules,” Sen. Jamilah Nasheed yells at Onder as he calls for order.
  • Parson calls for the secretary to call for the roll, Schaaf cries out for a point of order and is not recognized. The final vote to lay the motion on the table is defeated, 11-22.
  • “The only motion to supersede is to adjourn,” Lt. Gov. Parson says.
  • Sen. Walsh moves to adjourn to May 22, 2017, at 11 a.m. and asks for five members to stand. She gets it, and a vote is taken – 10-23, the motion is defeated.
  • 3:36 p.m.: Senate now voting on PQ, it passes 19-14.
  • The Senate is now voting on HCS for HBs 1194 & 1193, with SS & SA  (Prohibiting political subdivisions from requiring a minimum wage that exceeds the requirements of state law). It is adopted by a vote of 23-10, and the Senate now moves to third reading. Sen. Hegeman moves for a privileged motion to PQ on the bill.
  • Sen. Sifton moves to lay the bill on the table. Senate goes to a roll call vote. It fails with a vote of 9-24.
  • Nasheed moves to adjourn to May 22, 2017, at 11 a.m. It is defeated by a vote of 11-22.

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

  • Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal ends when Sen. Bob Dixon rises and asks that HB 655 be laid over.
  • Senate moves to take up HBs 1194 & 1193, pertaining to minimum wage. Trying to PQ.
  • Sen. Scott Sifton puts up a substitute asking to delay until 5:59 p.m. He then sends forward an amendment, changing “5:59” to “indefinitely.”
  • Sen. Will Kraus raises a point of order, saying the PQ is a non-debatable motion.
  • “This is shameful,” Sen. Kiki Curls says, clearly emotional. “I’m ashamed to be a member of this body right now, and it’s disgusting. It’s awful, it’s shameful, and it’s hypocritical. We should be ashamed of ourselves.” She says the chambers do not belong to the members of the Senate, but to the people.
  • Sen. Kraus withdraws his point of order, and puts forward another point of order, saying it’s not a superseding motion.
  • Sifton puts another substitute forward, Sen. Bob Onder rises for another point of order. He says that there are two superseding motions that take precedent. “These amendments are all out of order,” he says.
  • President Pro Tem Richard says the point of order is well taken.
  • Sen. Schaaf rises to speak on the point of order but does not get to speak, so he raises his own point of order. He says he should have been recognized in the proper sequence.
  • Sen. Gina Walsh rises, saying the point of order should be well taken, saying that no discussion was allowed.
  • Sen. Dave Schatz rises to speak, reading the rules that apply to the use of the PQ.
  • “We’re not stopping minimum wages, we’re cutting people’s wages,” Nasheed says.
  • Now back on the motion of the PQ. Senators still trying to raise a point of order as the roll call vote begins. Senators are casting no votes on the motion to lay it on the table, Sifton is seen signaling “thumbs down” to the other senators.
  • Vote is 6-27, Sen. Jason Holsman asks the vote be reconsidered.
  • “If you allow him to do it, Mr. President, you should be ashamed of yourself,” Schaaf says, telling the Lt. Gov. that he should not allow the President Pro Tem to interrupt any senator. Lt. Gov. Parson recognizes Richard, to which an enraged Schaaf pounds his fist on the desk and loudly asking “How could you?” of Parson.
  • Richard moves the Senate stand at ease for five minutes.
  • “I object,” Schaaf cries.

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

  • Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal continues reading from “Spies in the Congo”. She tells her colleagues that she’ll “read until session ends” after the House failed to pass her bill, SB 22, which sought to buy out homes near West Lake Landfill.
  • Power goes out again, voice heard saying “We need a grid!”
  • Sen. Chappelle-Nadal continues filibuster

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

  • SCS for SB 112 – Modifies provisions relating to political subdivisions – still being debated. Senate votes
  • Senate votes in favor of the legislation, 26-3.
  • Senate goes to House Bills on Third Reading, recognizes Dixon for HB 655-Engler (Dixon) – Extends the expiration date of tax credits for donations to pregnancy centers
  • Senators discussing the amendment put forward by Wasson, but after a point of order is raised by Sen. Schaaf (and subsequently withdrawn) he withdraws the amendment.
  • Momentary power outage in the Capitol, power returns after a few seconds.
  • Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal rises to filibuster the bill by reading from “Spies in the Congo”.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

  • The Senate returns at 10:30 a.m.
  • Senate takes SCS for SB 139-Sater, with HCS, as amended – establishes the Controlled Substance Abuse Prevention Fund and the Rx Cares for Missouri Program and modifies the MO HealthNet Pharmacy program.
  • Sater says it will save about $12 million in GR for the state, and that it’s about getting the best possible rebate for drugs. Sater moves for its adoption of the conference committee report, which is agreed to by 25-8. He closes and asks for a third reading, it passes 23-9.
  • Senate next takes up the conference committee report for SB 283-Hegeman, with HCS, as amended – enacts provisions relating to tourism commissions and special road district commissioner elections. It pass with 28-4.

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

  • The final day of the legislative session gets underway as Lt. Gov. Mike Parson gavels in the Senate shortly after 9 a.m.
  • The Senate goes to announcements, Republican Caucus will meet in Senate Lounge upon recess. The Senate will stand in recess until 10 a.m.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

11:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m.

  • Senate continues on the order of House Bills for Third Reading
  • Senate brings up HB 302 (Blue Alert bill) again for a vote. It passes 32-0, and the emergency clause does by the same amount.
  • Next up is HB 452 – Modifies provisions regarding actions against health care providers for personal injury or death.
  • Sen. Schaaf puts up an amendment to fix language in the bill, in order to clarify and make it consistent.
  • Senators vote to third read and pass the bill, which advances with a vote of 27-5.
  • Senate moves to announcements and will adjourn until 9 a.m. Friday.

10:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

  • Senate moves to the order of House Bills for Third Reading, and takes up HB 831 – Modifies provisions relating public retirement. Dixon asks that an amendment be reconsidered. The motion to reconsider carries 32-0. Dixon asks the amendment be sent back. It passes 32-0, as does the emergency clause.
  • Next up: HB 115 – Modifies provisions relating to intoxicating liquor for airports. Wasson sends forward a substitute. It passes 31-2.

9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

  • Senate continues debate on SB 35 – relating to state purchase of land. Senate takes up a vote after about an hour of debate, and it passes by a vote of 30-3.
  • Sen. Bob Dixon rises to move for the adoption of the conference report for SB 128 be adopted. The report is adopted 32-1, and Dixon once again rises to ask for the third reading and passage of 128.

8:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

  • Senate returns to session just after 8:30 p.m., takes up House Bills for Third Reading. Kehoe asks for a privileged motion for Sen. Shcatz on SB 225 – Modifies the permissible length of motor vehicles operated on highways. Senate approves the bill by a vote of 33-0.
  • Senate takes up SB 35 – relating to state purchase of land.

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

  • Senate takes up HB 302 – Creates the “Blue Alert System” for notifying the public when law enforcement officers are seriously injured or killed.
  • Sen. Rowden puts forward an amendment to attach Hailey’s Law to Blue Alert bill.
  • “I want to make sure it gets done,” Sen. Bob Dixon says.
  • Sen. Schaaf inquires of Sen. Dixon. “Senator, are you aware this bill has the Blue Alert on it?” noting that the Senate had previously passed a bill carrying a Blue Alert amendment. He asks if the House is blocking it.
  • Senate approves Rowden’s amendment.
  • Senate approves an amendment from Holsman inserting the words “known to be”.
  • Senate approves Hegeman’s amendment.
  • Schupp files an amendment, SA 4, seeking to remove language from the bill. Senate approves with a voice vote.
  • Schatz puts forward motion on HB 90 & 68 requesting to go back to conference committees with the House.
  • Sen. Kehoe motions that the body recess until 8:30 p.m.

 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

  • Senate takes up SB 64 – designates the Lyndon Ebker Memorial Bridge – Senate gives final approval.
  • Senate takes up SB 322 – Designates the USMA Cadet Thomas M. Surdyke Memorial Highway, passes 33-0.
  • Next up is SB 501 -Modifies provisions relating to health care.

 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • Senate passes SB 34 – Creates the crime of illegal reentry – with a final vote of 32-0, with every present senator voting in favor of the bill containing Blue Alert. Sen. Rob Schaaf makes sure he is recorded as an “Aye” vote.
  • The Senate now takes up SB 62 – Modifies provisions regarding various pension systems and allows the county recorder to collect an additional fee. It passes with a vote of 31-0.
  • Senate moves on to SB 222 – Modifies provisions relating to vehicle lighting equipment – passes 33-0
  • Next, the Senate deliberates on SB 111 – Modifies provisions relating to public administrators and allows a guardian to execute a preneed contract. The bill passes with a vote of 29-4.

 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

  • Wieland withdraws his motion, SB 302 is laid over.
  • Senate now taking up SB 34 – Creates the crime of illegal reentry
  • The bill contains a number of amendments, the most notable of which would create the Blue Alert system.
  • “Right now, this is the vehicle that the Blue Alert would be passed on,” Sen. Jill Schupp says, noting the blue lights placed outside the Capitol. Schupp says that she doesn’t like the underlying bill, but would support some of the amendments.
  • Sen. Rob Schaaf rises to say that he supports Blue Alert, and then pulls out a picture of the ad put out by A New Missouri saying that he was blocking Blue Alert and urging people to call his personal cell phone.
  • “I want everyone to know I support Blue Alert. I support Blue Alert,” Schaaf exclaims to the Senate galleries.

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues on SB 302 – Modifies provisions relating to certain local districts 
  • Sen. Ed Emery says that utility companies would be “revenue-neutral”, noting that the savings should be reflected on the customers.
  • It doesn’t cost the state a dime, we’re easing regulations, and creating jobs. This is straight from the Republican handbook, it seems to me,” Wieland says.
  • Sen. Hegeman asks to be recused from any vote on the issue.
  • Sen. Emery inquires of Sen. Gary Romine, who says there is no reason for the legislation because the PSC has the ability to do it.
  • Emery says the PSC is constrained by some of their goals and wants to know if Romine would allow this to come to a vote.
  • “What is your intention?” Emery asks.
  • “My intention for this to not come to a vote,” Romine replies.
  • Romine says you have to raise rates to make up for the special rates given. “The dollar just gets spread out among everyone else. It’s picking winners and losers.”
  • “If we pass this, we’ll be giving this corporate welfare to this one steel mill at the expense of everyone else,” Schaaf says.
  • Schaaf says that if you take money out of people’s pockets to put other jobs in place, and it costs someone else in some other place. “It doesn’t work… You cannot win.”
  • “They want something out of this, and are going to use the steel mill as a hostage to get it,” Romine says.

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Hundreds of jobs in Missouri’s bootheel at stake as session winds down

  • Sen. Wieland inquires of Sen. Wayne Wallingford, discussing how many jobs the legislation could bring to southeast Missouri. Wallingford says he can’t think of anything better to bring forward on the Senate floor than job creation.
  • Sen. Ed Emery said he talked to PSC Chairman Daniel Hall, who has been keeping an eye on it. Emery says Hall gave him his own opinion, saying “It gives us tools we can use at our discretion.”
  • Emery said Hall still had some issues with prior legislation like SB 190, but that the amendments in this bill could help.
  • “They (the PSC) cannot authorize anything beyond a three-year stretch,” Emery says.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues working on SB 49, the “St. Louis Zoo Tax” – Modifies provisions relating to county sales taxes for zoological organizations
  • Senators vote to approve House Amendment 1. Walsh again moves for the bill’s adoption. It passes with a vote of 31-2.
  • Sen. Kehoe asks for messages from the House, then goes to Announcements.
  • Senate recesses until 1:30 p.m.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues debating Sen. Schatz’ substitute to HB 104 – Repeals provisions relating to prevailing wages on public works.
  • While discussing the prevailing wage with Sen. Gina Walsh, Sen. Jacob Hummel says that he gets “frustrated when I hear who the ‘bad guys’ are, and it’s always the folks who don’t own businesses.”
  • Sen. Brown asks the bill be laid on the calendar.
  • Sen. Gina Walsh moves for the adoption SB 49, the “St. Louis Zoo Tax” – Modifies provisions relating to county sales taxes for zoological organizations

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

  • The Senate returns to session, takes up resolutions. They pass HCR 28 – Reaffirms Missouri’s support of the services of the sheltered workshops of our state
  • At 10:42 a.m. the Senate goes to House Bills on Second Reading.
  • Senate takes up HB 104 – Repeals provisions relating to prevailing wages on public works – for third reading.
  • Schatz puts a substitute forward that would exempt projects with a price tag of $500,000 or less. It would also redefine the prevailing wage as the average wage inside the county.
  • “I do believe this is a common-sense compromise,” Schatz says. He says maybe a total repeal is what they’ll do, but his amendment is seeking to find a middle-ground.

 

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

10:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

  • HCS for HBs 1194 & 1193 (Hegeman) – Prohibits political subdivisions from requiring a minimum wage that exceeds the requirements of state law. (cont.)
    • Amendment 1 – Nasheed
      • Nasheed: Not on my watch, Missouri Chamber of Commerce
      • Nasheed has solely filibustered for an hour and a half

8:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

  • HCS for HBs 1194 & 1193 (Hegeman) – Prohibits political subdivisions from requiring a minimum wage that exceeds the requirements of state law.
    • Amendment 1 – Nasheed
      • Amendment would raise state minimum wage to $9.00 per hour
      • Nasheed: I truly agree. It has been said that a tax on the poor and the struggling is the lowest display of power one can engage in.
      • Nasheed says she’s defending the people of St. Louis.
      • Nasheed: This bill is nothing more than a legislative attempt to divide this body, rural from urban.
      • Nasheed: Says the body has become dysfunctional. “Explain to me how attacking the local decision of cities like St. Louis or Kansas City will help address these dysfunctionalisms. [sic] You can’t, because it doesn’t.”
      • Senator has promised to filibuster the minimum wage hike on social media.
      • Nasheed: “Cities have the right, the obligation and the duty to step up to the plate and do what this state is failing to do.”
      • Nasheed: “If your business depends on giving your employees the slave wage, then it’s not a business we need in the state of Missouri.”
    • Bill placed onto the informal calendar
    • Privileged motions for conference committees
  • HCS for HBs 1194 & 1193 (Hegeman) – Prohibits political subdivisions from requiring a minimum wage that exceeds the requirements of state law.
    • Moving back onto the bill
    • Amendment 1 – Nasheed
      • Lists off the standard of living metrics in St. Louis.
      • Nasheed: “I’m gonna go on and on and on til you to back up off St. Louis when it comes to minimum wage.”
      • Nasheed has started her trademark quorum calls. It’s officially a filibuster.

7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

  • The Senate returns to session at 7:20 p.m. Sen. Bob Dixon recognized for a privileged motion, asks Senate refuse to concur on SB 128 and request a conference. His motion passes.
  • Senate moves to House Bills on Third Reading,
  • Takes up HCS for HBs 1194 & 1193 (Hegeman) – Prohibits political subdivisions from requiring a minimum wage that exceeds the requirements of state law.
    • Bill is controversial, Democrats have praised minimum wage increases in St. Louis and Kansas City where Democrats control politics. Recent court cases have allowed the cities to raise their wage above the state level, which is $77.65, 40 cents over the federal minimum wage.
    • Libla: The amount of young people we’ve got that don’t even have summer jobs right now, and here we are trying to get this patchwork of minimum wage across the state.
    • Libla: Business will always find a way to get their product out to the public where it needs to be.
    • Libla: When you price yourself out of what the profit margins are… it’s only going to cause more unemployment with the kids and those people who so desperately need the opportunity.
    • Wallingford: “When you show up somewhere for a job and you have no skills, no talent, are you expected to get a wage for people with skills and talent?”
    • Wallingford: Companies, the number one thing they want is consistency. They don’t like inconsistency.

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues their work on HCS HB 460, debating an amendment to the bill by Sen. Schatz.
  • At 5:38 p.m., that bill is laid over. Sen. Kehoe asks for messages from the House.
  • The Senate now goes to privileged motions, refuses to concur with House positions on several bills.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues debate on HCS HB 460 – Modifies provisions relating to civil procedure for joinder, intervention, and venue in civil actions

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

  • The Senate takes up HCS HB 460 – Modifies provisions relating to civil procedure for joinder, intervention, and venue in civil actions
  • While debating the bill, Sen. Rob Schaaf references a class-action lawsuit against TAMKO Building Products, Inc. which is owned by GOP mega-donor David Humphreys. Sen. Onder points out that the case is in federal court, so would not fall under the scope of this bill.
  • Schaaf and Sen. Jason Holsman discuss the bill, questioning how it would affect companies like GM or Monsanto, who could potentially be affected by it.
  • “As far as I’m concerned, I’m wading in trial attorney blood right now,” Holsman says. “It’s up to the waist.”
  • “I hope that the people of Missouri are massively offended that this legislation is coming forward,” Schaaf says. “It could be about anybody that could be joined together with other people on a case.” Schaaf points out flaws he sees in the legislation in regard to combining plaintiffs under one umbrella.
  • “The people who would benefit from this are the people who drive the legislative process, and it’s time to expose them,” Schaaf says.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues debate on  HCS for HCR 47. After nearly two hours of discussion, Sen. Eigel is recognized to close. It passes with a unanimous vote of 33-0.
  • The Senate recesses until 2:30 p.m.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues debate on  HCS for HCR 47 – Sen. Bill Eigel and Sen. Doug Libla continue discussing the issue of funding for Missouri transportation and the rates.
  • “It’s not that MoDOT isn’t doing their part,” Eigel said. He says that the issue is Missouri took out bonds that the state still has to pay for.
  • Libla says the issue is courage. “I’ve always been more proactive than reactive,” he said, saying he likes to fix things to before they break, and then ends his inquiry.
  • Sen. Sifton rises to inquire of Eigel. “The reality is that the place where we find ourselves in funding is many years in the making,” Sifton says. “We don’t have a plan to get there from here until some bonds retire in the next decade.”

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

  • The Senate returns to session Wednesday morning, Lt. Gov. Mike Parson gavels them into session at 10:16 a.m.
  • Sen. Mike Cunningham moves for the adoption of SCR 25 – Establishes the State Innovation Waiver Task Force
  • After about a half hour of debate, it is laid on the calendar.
  • Sen. Bill Eigel presents HCS for HCR 47 (Eigel) – Establishes the 21st Century Missouri Transportation System Task Force
  • He says it’s their best opportunity to find a transportation funding solution.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

12:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m.

  • The Senate votes on REAL ID, passing it with a final vote of 27-6, the emergency clause also passes.
  • Senate brings up HB 93-Lauer, with SCS (Wasson) again – Modifies provisions relating to job training
  • Wasson moves for the adoption. The Senate passes the bill with a final vote of 27-6 and adjourns under the rules.

11:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m.

  • The Senate continues working on Silvey’s REAL ID legislation, Sen. Jamilah Nasheed offers a fifth amendment concerning Voter ID to the bill. Kraus says that if this were passed, it would cost an additional money. He says he wants it to be as cheap as possible.
  • Sen. Kiki Curls asks Silvey to explain. “Will we have two different systems?” in regards to Voter ID and REAL ID.
  • “There will be a choice for the citizen to decide,” Silvey said. “The only two systems involved is whether we retain your documents or not.”
  • Nasheed’s amendment looks to strike this from the bill:
    Section 1. In the event the state is required to provide a citizen with photo identification acceptable for election purposes, such identification shall be a nondriver identification card that is not compliant with the federal REAL ID Act of 2005.
  • Kraus tells Nasheed that he has explained it several times as best as he can, says they should let the chamber decide.
  • Schaaf encourages senators to vote for Nasheed’s amendment, saying it’s the right thing to do. They put it to a vote, and the voice vote is unclear, so they will have a standing division. It fails with a vote of 13-19.
  • “They’ve had 13 years to repeal it, and they haven’t,” Silvey says of REAL ID in the U.S.

10:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

  • The Senate debates Sen. Dan Hegeman’s request to exceed the difference in the conference for SB 111 – Modifies provisions relating to public administrators and allows a guardian to execute a preneed contract. The Senate approves the motion with a voice vote.
  • Sen. Kehoe asks the Senate to take up HB 850-Davis (Kraus) for third reading– Modifies the complaint process for members of the state military forces. Kraus says the language is cleaned up to remove the governor from the chain of command for the complaint process. It passes with a vote of 29-2.
  • The Senate takes up HB 93-Lauer, with SCS (Wasson) – Modifies provisions relating to job training
  • Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal rises once again to filibuster, taking up her book and reading.
  • At 10:47 p.m., that bill is laid on the informal calendar, and they take up REAL ID once again. Silvey asks that his substitute be sent back, puts forward a new one, which he says he hopes will be the final substitute. He says they spent all afternoon perfecting it with everyone.
  • New provisions include: make it a crime to illegally access the data, no source documents used in interstate database; 5 year sunset
  • Silvey sends forward an amendment, saying it was an issue outlined by Homeland Security. It passes with a voice vote.
  • Kraus sends forward an amendment, addressing the “no duplicate fee” provision. Silvey speaks in support, chamber votes it through.
  • Kraus’ second amendment will work to ensure that the Department of Revenue will have a separate server that is not connected and protect against hacking. It passed with a voice vote.
  • Silvey files his second amendment to correct a reference. It passes with a voice vote.

9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

  • Senate returns from recess at 9:18 p.m. and receives messages from the House.
  • At 9:30 p.m., the Senate goes to the business of House Bills on Third Reading. First up is HCS for HB 831 (Hummel) – Modifies provisions relating public retirement. “This has become the Senate pension omnibus bill,” Hummel says.
  • Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal rises to speak, starts talking about lobbyists who have opposed her bill, SB 22. She tells Sen. Hummel that either this bill will be placed on the informal calendar or she will filibuster by reading a book on the floor.
  • “I’m trying to make a point because I’m trying to save lives,” she tells Hummel, and then begins reading at 9:47 p.m.
  • That bill is laid over.

7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

  • Senate continues the debate for the fourth hour on HCS for HB 452 (Rowden) – Modifies provisions regarding actions against health care providers for personal injury or death.
  • Schaaf asks his amendment be sent back and puts forward a new one for adoption.
  • He says it would change the word “directly” to “completely” and specify that an employee is an individual is “completely” compensated by the healthcare provider.
  • “What we are attempting to do is fix the muddiness caused by the Jefferson case,” Rowden says.
  • Sen. Sifton says he’s going to step off the floor and draft some amendments “on the fly”.
  • Rowden asks that the bill is laid on the informal calendar.
  • Sen. Koenig asks the Senate refuse to recede their position on HCB 3, it passes with a voice vote.
  • Sen. Kehoe asks that the Senate stand in recess until 9 p.m.

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

  • Senate continues debate for the third hour on HCS for HB 452 (Rowden) – Modifies provisions regarding actions against health care providers for personal injury or death.

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

  • Senate continues debate on HCS for HB 452 (Rowden) – Modifies provisions regarding actions against health care providers for personal injury or death.
  • “The Senate committee substitute version would’ve allowed you to drop your liability insurance, and bam, you’re not an employee and can’t sue,” Sen. Rob Schaaf said.
  • Schaaf argues that another issue with the legislation, which includes a definition of employee, and he says that could be troublesome as well.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • Senate continues debate on HCS for HB 452 (Rowden) – Modifies provisions regarding actions against health care providers for personal injury or death.

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

  • Senate moves on to HCS for HB 451 (Wasson) – Provides that a change in population shall not remove a city, county, or political subdivision from the operation of a law
  • Wasson says the bill is the same as SB 124, which passed the chamber 33-0. Schupp says she will reluctantly support the bill but not the emergency clause.
  • The bill passes 33-0.
  • Sen. Gina Walsh asks the Senate to take up the conference report on SB 50 establishes the Advance Health Care Directive Registry. It is adopted 33-0.
  • Kehoe brings up HB 850-Davis (Kraus) – Modifies the complaint process for members of the state military forces
  • Kraus asks it be put on the informal calendar.
  • Senate takes up HCS for HB 452 (Rowden) – Modifies provisions regarding actions against health care providers for personal injury or death.

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

  • The Senate returns to session at 2 p.m., 45 minutes after the proposed 1:15 p.m. start time.
  • The Senate takes up House Bills for Third Reading, beginning with HCS for HB 292 (Cunningham) – Modifies provisions relating to the powers of certain financial institutions. The Senate had previously debated the bill on Monday before laying it over.
  • Sen. Jill Schupp inquires of the sponsor, Sen. Cunningham, to discuss how the legislation would apply, especially in regards to credit cards. Schupp says that she wants to look out for the consumers, and will not vote in favor of the bill, but also will not filibuster it.
  • The senators also discuss the annual seersucker photo, scheduled to take place on Wednesday at 9:45 a.m.
  • After more than a half hour of debate, the Senate third reads and passes the bill.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

  • Kraus and Silvey continue debating Kraus’ amendment. “I’m not trying to ambush you,” Silvey says. He says he intends to file an amendment to Kraus’ amendment to remove the non-separable clause.
  • Sens. Rob Schaaf and Kraus continue the debate, discussing Voter ID issues with REAL ID.
  • Schaaf says that the Dept. of Homeland Security could use an alternate method to ensure that people do not have two different licenses issued to the same person. Silvey says he does not recall but says they should be able to compare photos and signatures in the system to avoid duplicates.
  • Sen. Silvey is recognized to close on his amendment to Kraus’ amendment. It passes with only Kraus casting a ‘no’ vote to try and keep his non-separable clause. His amendment is still on the table, with the exclusion of that piece.
  • “Basically, you’re creating another level of profiling,” Nasheed tells Kraus. She asks that the Senate vote down his amendment. “The whole idea is to let immigrants get IDs… and this was not intended for them to be profiled… You’re not a bad person, you just have bad ideas.”
  • Sen. Gina Walsh rises to talk about the same amendment, and after a few minutes, Kraus withdraws the amendment.
  • Kraus now puts forward the revised version of his “duplicate fee” amendment with Schaaf’s correction. Basically, it would allow citizens to get a REAL ID again if it was lost or destroyed without being charged a second time.
  • Schaaf inquires with Kehoe as to whether there may be a lunch break. “My intention was to take a lunch break at some point in time,” Kehoe said.
  • Silvey and Kraus rise again to talk. Silvey asks if it was Kraus’ intent, that if someone goes to transition from a non-compliant ID to a REAL ID, that they not be charged twice.
  • Silvey asks that it be laid on the informal calendar.
  • Kehoe asks for messages from the House. House grants a conference on SB 302 with the Senate.
  • The Senate recesses until 1:15 p.m.

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

  • The Senate returns to session Tuesday morning, Sen. Mike Kehoe asks for a waiver of the rules to take up a resolution granting usage of the chamber. It is adopted by a voice vote.
  • The Senate then asks for messages from the House, which are announced, laying out conferees for the bills going to conference.
  • Kehoe asks that the Senate go to House Bills for Third Reading.
  • Sen. Ryan Silvey asks that HB 151 (REAL ID) come before the body.
  • Sen. Will Kraus rises for a point of order, then withdraws it.
  • Silvey lays out the ways they have changed the bill in the substitute, says that REAL ID is needed to get in compliance with the nation and allow Missourians to fly and enter military bases.
  • Sen. Kraus puts forward an amendment on duplicate fees. “I don’t think we should be charging a duplicate fee of every Missourian,” he says. He says it puts them back on “where they were on the Senate version”, doesn’t want to penalize those who want REAL ID. Silvey says he supports the amendment and would be happy to vote for it.
  • Sen. Jamilah Nasheed asks Kraus to clarify. He talks about how the fiscal note says a fee will bring in millions of dollars, and says they should not charge a duplicate fee for getting a replacement ID that is compliant.
  • Sen. Bob Dixon inquires of Sen. Kiki Curls, saying he had to share something with her, noting they had made the international edition of USA Today for their vocal prowess on the Senate floor last week, singing “Kumbaya”.
  • Sen. Jason Holsman inquires of Dixon. “Are you the lion of the Senate?” Holsman asks of him. He responds that if anyone is, it is Sen. Ryan Silvey. “He does not know what fear is.”
  • “What does that make you then?” Holsman asks. “I’m just an old lump of coal, but I’ll be a diamond someday,” Dixon responds, referencing a song by John Anderson.
  • Kraus says his amendment saves $7.50 per person.
  • Sen. Rob Schaaf points out a potential issue with Kraus’ amendment, so he asks that it be sent back and puts forward another while Schaaf works to correct it.
  • “I don’t want to do it, I think this is a horrible bill,” Kraus says of REAL ID while debating Sen. Nasheed.
  • Kraus says that he’s concerned that they’ll try to put protections in and they would then get thrown out, explaining why he wants a non-separable clause. Silvey notes the only way things would be thrown out is if the courts rule that it is unconstitutional. He says he is worried that Kraus’ provision would see the entire bill thrown out.

Monday, May 8, 2017

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

  • Senators continue debate on HCS for HB 292, with SCS (Cunningham) – Modifies provisions relating to the powers of certain financial institutions. Schaaf and Holsman continue debating Holsman’s amendment, which he says he has discussed with the House sponsor. “If my amendment is not quite ready for prime time…I’m willing to withdraw and not take a vote on it,” Holsman says. He notes that he will take it up next year. After Schaaf continues the debate, Holsman withdraws the amendment and Cunningham asks the bill to be laid over.
  • Senate now takes up HCS for HBs 190 & 208 (Eigel) – Allows community college police officers to establish regulations to control vehicular traffic on any thoroughfare owned or maintained by the college
  • After razzing Sen. Eigel for his first bill on the floor, the Senate passes the bill 30-2.
  • Receiving messages from the House, grants conferences on SB 34, SB 64, SB 50, SB 62, SB 111, SB 411.
  • Senate goes to announcements at 6:54 p.m. and then stands adjourned.

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

  • Senate takes up for third reading Sen. Sater’s SCS for SB 161, which establishes the Ozark Exploration Bicentennial Commission. It passes 31-2.
  • Senate takes up HB 336-Shull (Wieland) for third reading. It provides that riders, endorsements, and amendments to life insurance policies may contain suicide exclusions or limitations.
  • “Is there any unintended consequences?” Sen. Schaaf asks.
  • The bill gets final approval from the Senate.
  • Next up, HCS for HB 292, with SCS (Cunningham) – Modifies provisions relating to the powers of certain financial institutions (i.e. state banks). Cunningham says it would put state banks on par with national banks on a number of issues.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • Senate continues debate on Sater’s SB 160, which modifies provisions relating to child protection.
  • Senate takes roll call vote on the bill, it passes 31-1 with an emergency clause.
  • The Senate names the members of the conference committee appointments on HB 90 & 68: Schatz, Kraus, Sater, Schupp, Hummel
  • Senate takes up SB 66 (Schatz) – Modifies provisions of law relating to workers’ compensation
  • After nearly an hour of debate, the Senate passes it with a vote of 23-10.

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

  • Sen. Curls renews her motion to close HCB 3 and be adopted. It passes with a voice vote.
  • Sen. Koenig rises to close on HCB 3. It passes with a vote of 27-5. The emergency clause vote passes by the same number of votes.
  • Sen. Dave Schatz asks that HB 90 & 68 (Narcotics Control Act) go to conference with the House. Sen. Will Kraus rises and moves that the Senate refuse to recede and go to conference, which he says would allow them to conference but not exceed the differences. Schatz inquires of Kraus and says that this bill is far better than what is being created county by county in Missouri.
  • Sens. Rob Schaaf and Bob Onder discuss the bill, talking about their concerns with the PDMP legislation. Schaaf argues against putting people’s information on a database.
  • Senate votes in favor of Kraus’ motion, meaning the Senate can go to conference without exceeding the Senate position.
  • Senate now takes up Sater’s SB 160, which modifies provisions relating to child protection.

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

  • The Senate is still not in the chamber. As of 2:30 p.m. senators begin filing in, Lt.Gov. Mike Parson gavels the Senate into session at 2:36 p.m.
  • Sen. Mike Kehoe moves that the Senate go to House Bills on Third Reading, and Sen. Andrew Koenig moves for the Senate to reconsider votes on HCB 3. The Senate agrees with a roll call vote of 30-2, with Sens. Kraus and Schaaf objecting.
  • Sen. Kiki Curls puts forward a substitute amendment, which changes the words “transfer” to “deposit”.
  • Silvey points to a similar bill that used an issue on this type of amendment of 2013,  saying that by using this language, it would prevent similar technical issues and gives more direction to the administration on how to carry it out.
  • Sen. Jill Schupp asks Curls about the possibility of making sure that there is no sweeping of funds from Children’s Trust Fund. Curls says she believes it would be hard to get that passed now.
  • “If this is so important that it justifies using one-time funds, will we have the will to prevent that point count from going up?” Sen. Rob Schaaf asks.

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

  • The Senate is scheduled to return to session at 1 p.m.

Friday, May 5, 2017

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

  • Sen. Dan Brown puts forward his amendment, saying it all came about “on the fly.”  His amendment would allow someone to go to court and allege coordination between 501c4s and a candidate.
  • The public hasn’t had the chance to testify, and I think they’re tired of this story,” Dixon said.
  • Several senators rise when Dixon rests.
  • “I’m hopeful that the governor is listening, and I’m hopeful he changes his behavior. A true leader would direct, and he can change behavior,” Sen. Dave Schatz says, talking about the governor.
  • “He’s trying,” Dixon replied.
  • Schatz says he’s concerned about a nuisance lawsuit, and the costs of defending those cases.
  • Dixon calls what the Senate has been through this year “cruel and unusual punishment.”
  • Dixon adds an amendment to his amendment, which he says make a slight correction to the bill. Now inquiring again of Onder. Holsman then rises to inquire of Dixon on his amendment.
  • “We’re not trying to shut the attacks down, we’re just trying to ask who is paying for them so we can face them,” Holsman said.
  • Holsman asks for a roll call vote.
  • Sen. Kehoe rises to speak on the amendment and says that attacking senators is where the line is drawn, and is unacceptable.
  • “I do want to let the body know that I think attacks on fellow senators are way, way, way out of whack,” Kehoe said.
  • He then asks that the bill, SB 305, and the subsequent roll call be laid on the informal calendar.

1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

  • Schaaf withdraws his dark money amendment, files an amendment seeking to “go the opposite way” of Onder’s amendment.
  • “Senate Amendment 3 is designed to improve transparency and consistency in our campaign finance laws,” Schaaf says. “All this amendment would require is that contributions to a candidate be counted as such.”
  • Schaaf says it would require indirect contributions to be recorded, meaning that, for example, if A New Missouri spent money on ads for Gov. Greitens, they would report it as a contribution to him.
  • Romine rises to speak, saying the ripple effect will be that “we will see an expansion of nonprofits”
  • Schaaf says it seems obvious that the Senate will not allow the exposure of dark money, and it will fall to the people of Missouri to do it. “And they will,” he says.
  • “We’re not approaching this with a sincere desire to fix a problem,” Romine says.
  • Romine says that he would hate to see legislation fail because of relationships and personal feelings amongst senators.
  • “We do have a problem in front of us, and it needs to be addressed,” Romine says.
  • Onder says that on Monday, Schaaf said he wanted a fair debate on the bill. “You could have had a vote on your bill, Senator,” Onder said. “Why didn’t you let that vote happen, Senator?”
  • “I felt that your amendment was just a poison pill,” Schaaf says. He said it wouldn’t have been a vote the public would have understood.
  • Onder says that “the court struck down just about everything” on Amendment 2. Here’s the court decision.
  • Sen. Bob Dixon asks for consent that the Senate stand at ease for 10 minutes.
  • Senate comes back, Schaaf withdraws his amendment.
  • Sen. Bob Dixon inquires of Sen. Doug Libla, asking him to speak about his work with law enforcement on MASTERS.
  • “It was started in 1979, and has one focus – to take care of families of Highway Patrolmen killed in the line of duty,” Libla says.
  • “Those men and women in law enforcement put their lives on the line every day and night,” Dixon said.
  • “They get murdered, they get executed… some of it’s happened in my district,” Libla responds, his voice cracking. “We’ve handled 21 deaths so far.”
  • Libla and Dixon both stall, clearly emotional.
  • “Senator, sometimes, there are no words. But when I look at you, you bleed blue,” Dixon told Libla. He then asked to speak on a point of personal privilege.
  • In the last course of hours, days, there was some news put out by the Springfield News-Leader regarding potential attacks on senators by A New Missouri.
  • “Here’s what I have to say about that… HAHAHAHA!” Dixon roared.
  • Mr. President, I’m sorry for laughing, but that’s what happened to me last night. None of the senators seemed by the prospect of facing these attacks when approached by the Springfield News-Leader seemed bothered,” he said. “The only Democrat seemed almost happy.”
  • “And I want to say, that with every fiber of my being… I am honored to be found on a list with those mentioned. Every single one. Why? Because they are senators,” he roared. “Honored. Men and women of honor, what every single person is in this body. I have a lot of mixed emotions and thoughts, which I think have been reflected today, but there’s one I would like to thank for getting us to this point. Iron sharpens iron, but the Senator from Buchanan, all of us know you mean good.”
  • Dixon said he saw a painting of “Daniel in the Lions’ Den” while visiting Schaaf’s office the other day and thought as he left “Daniel really ticked someone off”.
  • “I thank the senator from Buchanan. Mr. President, we find ourselves today… I’ve heard the words dark money for as long as I can remember this session. Unfortunately, that has been the story of Missouri politics this session: dark money and dysfunction. It’s more than dark money. Despite all of its complexities, we live in a binary world. This is about darkness and light. There are two choices: life and death, darkness and light, on and off, right and wrong, open and closed. We debate complexities in this beautiful chamber, all of men and women of honor. I know we’re all trying to make a good choice, everyone has a different perspective as to what that is Why are we here? The people. The people sent us here. The people expect and they deserve openness. Who hides, who slinks around under the cloak of darkness and professes to serve the people who expect openness? I’m so proud to be a senator and serve with every one of my colleagues in a tumultuous session.”
  • Referring to the work done on the budget on Thursday night, Dixon said “the lamb laid down next to the lion, and I was swept with emotion as I watched it unfold. Statesmanship. One senator, in particular, knows exactly what I’m talking about.”
  • Mr. President, I have tried to keep my mouth shut in the press in deference to the governor,” Dixon says, telling the Senate how he had been taken back by a quote from Rep. Cookson about Ronald Reagan’s 11th commandment, saying it warmed his heart. But he said that he didn’t think that commandment was being used by all, particularly A New Missouri.
  • “I bet that’s where we find Reagan’s 11th commandment there – in the trash can. Austin Powers, Austin Chambers, whatever… I’m going to vote for the Blue Alert, for crying out loud… conservative principles WHILE RONALD REAGAN IS IN THE TRASH CAN. Trashing him, trashing the Missouri Senate, systems of government and people of honor… leadership would’ve put an end to that a long time ago. The duty has fallen to the Missouri Senate, which is filled to the brim with men and women of honor.”
  • Sen. Dixon puts forward an amendment on the bill.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

  • Sens. Bob Onder and Jason Holsman continue debating on the dark money amendment.
  • Holsman says that any political activity should be treated the same, whether it’s for a 501c4 or anyone else.
  • “Right now, the executive branch has set up a 501 c4… and to me, that is a campaign,” Holsman says.
  • Holsman now referring to the A New Missouri ads uncovered by a Springfield News-Leader report – “Should we know who paid for the attacks? YES OR NO?” Holsman repeatedly exclaims. “If they attacked the senator from the 34th, we should know.”
  • Onder says nonprofits should not be forced to disclose, which Holsman says proves some are treated more “equal” than others.
  • Sen. Holsman moves on to discuss the issue with Sen. Ryan Silvey.
  • Silvey says there’s a loophole that allows for an amount up to a certain level of political activity, which he says is an unintended consequence. “The arguments we’ve heard this morning are strained and painful to listen to,” he says.
  • Holsman says “we’re big boys, we can handle them” concerning potential attacks from A New Missouri. He says he welcomes them.
  • Silvey says the First Amendment protects free speech, meaning there’s no need for anonymity.
  • “You have to be a citizen to enjoy the freedom of speech,” Holsman said. “They can say whatever they want, I am not restricting it in any way, shape or form.”
  • Silvey argues it’s about the right to face the accuser and consistency.
  • “Why are we not arguing to get rid of political campaign finance disclosures?” Silvey asks.
  • Before closing, Holsman asks Silvey the same question he asked of Onder: “Should we know who paid for the attacks?”
  • “Absolutely, just like when we run an attack on our opponents, we have to say who it’s paid for,” Silvey responds.
  • After Onder puts forward another amendment, he and Schaaf rise once again to debate, and then Schaaf moves on to talk with Holsman.
  • “I think it’s clear that the Senator for the 2nd (Onder) has decided that he is going to kill this bill,” Holsman said.
  • “By offering this amendment, which totally guts it, he’s not allowing us to do that,” Schaaf says of Onder’s statement that he would like to see a vote.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

  • Sens. Bob Onder and Rob Schaaf continue debating Schaaf’s amendment to Kehoe’s ‘gift ban’ bill.
  • Onder says that Schaaf’s amendment is unconstitutional, and violates free speech rights. He also says it exempts unions, which Schaaf disagrees with.
  • Onder finishes his inquiry of Schaaf, now talking to Sen. Bill Eigel. Eigel speaks about concerns of using the word “transparency” in the wrong way. Talking about citizens who wanted their free speech to remain anonymous, and also have been retaliated against for their speech.
  • “Nonprofits have a right to privacy,” Onder says. He says it’s ironic that Schaaf fought so hard against databases for PDMP, but is now advocating for putting the nonprofits’ disclosures into a government database.
  • “Many times, putting our hands on the lever of government to make something better… in the end, makes it worse,” Eigel says.
  • “We’re talking about our most cherished and sacred right – our free speech,” Onder says. “I really do not see that because one senator feels that a particular 501c4’s Facebook ads went over the line that we should inflict first amendment restrictions on others.”
  • Eigel says they could actually reduce transparency in their efforts to increase transparency.
  • Onder says everyone has a right to privacy and not be exposed.
  • “We have secret voting in this country, do we call it ‘dark voting’?” Onder asks.
  • At 11:30 a.m., Sen. Onder files an amendment to Schaaf’s amendment and moves for its adoption.
  • “It does not treat everyone fairly, and specifically excludes transfers between unions,” Onder says, which he says the amendment will fix by cutting lines from Schaaf’s amendment.
  • Sen. Schaaf comes back in the chamber shortly before noon and pulls his amendment, putting forward a new one which he says incorporates
  • “Your position that what we’re doing is that we’re not treating entities equally,” Sen. Jason Holsman says, addressing Sen. Onder. “Do you think we should have regulations on any political behavior of the members of the General Assembly at all?”
  • He says that current statute already has a database. “Would you like to get rid of the MEC database?” he asks Onder. “No,” Onder said.
  • “So, the MEC database is OK with you… but you think that somehow putting 501c4’s into the MEC database is not OK? Explain how that is not equal,” Holsman says.

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

  • The Senate continues debate on Sen. Ed Emery’s SJR 5, which relates to impeachment proceedings.
  • Emery argues the need for this is to put back the checks and balances in Missouri. After debating for a time, Emery asks that the bill is placed on the calendar.
  • Senate takes up Sen. Mike Kehoe’s SB 305, which deals with limiting lobbyist gifts. Kehoe puts forward a substitute. Click here to read it: Kehoe SS SB 305.
  • Sen. Rob Schaaf puts forward an amendment and moves for its adoption. View the amendment here: Schaaf SA SS SB 305 Lobbyists
  • “This amendment would put a ban on dark money without being disclosed on the bill,” Schaaf said. “Secret money has become a major force in the state. Secret money was used in attempts to influence politics in the Missouri legislature this year.”
  • “It creates a risk of corruption… and is corrosive to our process,” Schaaf says. “There should be no such influence as is occurring now by the executive branch trying to influence the legislative branch.”
  • Sen. Bob Onder says “here is the bill, the bill that was more important than the budget, than any other bill.”
  • “It’s a very fine day to defend liberty today,” Onder said. “We’re talking about free speech.”
  • “It’s my hope that when this gets to a vote, it will defend First Amendment rights, treat everyone equally, etc.
  • “I don’t see how I would be taking away their liberty so much, and maybe you could explain it,” Schaaf said.
  • “Your bill would require disclosure from nonprofits, even if the primary purpose of that nonprofit is non-political,” Onder says.
  • “You’re actually kind of making my case for me,” Schaaf says.
  • Some nonprofits who would be affected, according to Onder: Americans for Prosperity and the Adam Smith foundation, NRA, Heritage Foundation, Missouri Alliance for Freedom, MO Farm Bureau, Planned Parenthood, EMILY’S List, HSUS, PROMO
  • “Even churches would be impacted,” Onder says.

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Having adjourned late Thursday night, the Senate reconvenes on Friday morning. The senators begin filing in at 9:30 a.m. and Lt. Gov. Mike Parson gavels in the session.

Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal rises to talk about a death that occurred in the St. Louis. She speaks about Ferguson activists that have been found dead or killed, saying this latest one is the third or fourth one to have happened.

  • Sen. Mike Kehoe moves that the Senate goes to the business of Senate bills for perfection. First up is Sen. Jeanie Riddle’s SB 495, which modifies provisions relating to trauma, STEMI, and stroke centers and medical emergencies. She moves that it be perfected, and it advances with a voice vote.
  • The following senators move that these bills be placed on the informal calendar:
    • SB 532-Hoskins – Modifies provisions relating to Department of Mental Health inspections
    • SB 518-Emery  – Modifies provisions relating to hospital licensure
    • SB 341-Nasheed, with SCS – Modifies provisions relating to offenses involving prostitution when those offenses involve children or persons under the influence of an agent
  • Sen. Ed Emery asks that SJR 5 be taken up for perfection. It seeks to require the Senate, beginning January 1, 2019, to try all impeachments except for the impeachment of the Governor, which shall be tried by the Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court.

Thursday, May 4, 2017

10:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

  • HB 11 – Appropriations, Department of Social Services (cont.)

    • The Senate continues debate on the social services portion of the budget.
    • The Senate passes HB 11 with a vote of 21-12.
  • HB 12 – Appropriations, Judiciary, Office of the State Public Defender, and General Assembly
    • The Senate passes it with a vote of 32-1.
  • HB 17 – Appropriations, Capitol Improvement
    • Passes 32-1
    • Senate adjourns until 9 a.m. on Friday, May 5.

9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.

  • HCB 3 (cont.)
    • The Senate continues debating the circuit breaker, with Sen. Will Kraus inquiring of the other senators in the 9 o’clock hour.
    • The Senate passes the Senate amendment by a voice vote.
    • “The purpose of this bill has clearly changed,” Sen. Rob Schaaf said. “There’s a lot of people in the state who are not going to be happy that their funds are being swept. What you’ve really done here is pick winners and losers.”
    • The Senate passes HCB 3 with a vote of 28-5. The Senate also votes to enact the emergency clause on the bill by a vote of 28-5.
  • HB 11 – Appropriations, Department of Social Services

    • The Senate moves onto HB 11, which Sen. Schaaf begins by reading a letter he received about managed care, urging the senator to fight against or potentially get rid of it.
    • Sen. Sifton points out that even with the potential passage of HCB 3, there will still be some losses in reimbursement for the facilities.

8:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

  • HCB 3 (cont.)
    • Sen. Rob Schaaf raises a point of order, saying that the amendment works against the purpose of the bill, Silvey asks that it not be well taken.
    • “We’re taking a bill and striking every word of that bill out, and putting in completely different language,” Sen. Will Kraus. His point is that it would set a precedent for the future to “delete every word in a bill and replace it.”
    • Sen. Bill Eigel says that new amendment seeks to grant a new power to the commissioner of OA.
    • Sen. Ron Richard rules on the point of order, saying it is not well taken, meaning the amendment continues.
    • “What you’re looking to do right now is keep the circuit breaker by sweeping other funds,” Sen. Jamilah Nasheed said. She says that the ones fighting against the sweep didn’t say one word when they were sweeping funds from the elderly and those living with disabilities.
    • Sen. Denny Hoskins add an amendment limiting the scope of the sweep of funds, and it passes 27-4 in standing division.

7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

  • HB 10 – Appropriations, Department of Mental Health, Board of Public Buildings, and Department of Health and Senior Services (continued)
  • Senate returns at 7:30 p.m.
  • The Senate takes up bills for third reading and moves for the final passage of HCB 3.
    • Sen. Kiki Curls withdraws her amendment and puts forward a new one, which seeks to put a one-time deposit into the Missouri Senior Services Protection Fund. The amendment would allow the Commissioner of the Office of Administration to analyze the funds and see where to pull them from.
    • “Mr. President, we’re trying to find a solution,” Curls says.
    • “I heard some Democrats were planning to filibuster HB 11 if we don’t fund the 21-24 points. Is there any truth to that?” Schaaf asked Curls. She says she can’t speak to that.
    • “Why don’t we get rid of it (managed care) statewide? $100 million we would save,” Schaaf exclaims. “Now you want to sweep all of the other funds into this.”
    • “We’re trying to restore some of the services,” Curls said.
    • “Several funds have exceeded the value that they are allowed to have,” Sen. Ryan Silvey said. “We find ourselves not in an ideal situation.”
    • Curls: Trying to get some additional services, bringing the point system back down to 21 points.
    • Richard: “I want to applaud the Sen. from Clay, thought it was a creative approach to a problem and having also the Senator from the 9th participate. I think it’s a situation where we can cross party lines, solve some differences down the road, and I want to thank the Senator for it.”

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

  • HB 10 – Appropriations, Department of Mental Health, Board of Public Buildings, and Department of Health and Senior Services (continued)
  • Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal says that she doesn’t want to see people go to nursing homes unnecessarily, saying that “neighborhoods need their seniors.”
  • The Senate passes HB 10 with a constitutional majority vote of 22-11. Sens. Chappelle-Nadal, Holsman, Hummel, Kraus, Libla, Schaaf, Schupp, Sifton, Wallingford, and Walsh all oppose.
  • Senate goes to reports of standing committees, then receives messages from the House.
  • Sen. Kehoe moves to stand in recess until 6:30 p.m. for a dinner break.
  • Schaaf asks if Kehoe intends for the Senate to come back tomorrow, which Kehoe says they would go to Senate bills for perfection tomorrow.

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • HB 10 – Appropriations, Department of Mental Health, Board of Public Buildings, and Department of Health and Senior Services (continued)
  • “I tried my best, I just didn’t have enough money,” Brown said. “We spend a lot of our budget trying to help folks… but I’m not absolutely happy where I’m at.”
  • Sen. Sifton rises to say that, no matter what, they’d be making the second worst healthcare decision in the country today, referring to the U.S. House’s decision on the health care bill.
  • Sifton says he would have preferred a chance to conference. He says that the House adjourning left them only two options: passing the budget or going to special session.
  • “Passing circuit still leaves these populations compromised,” Sifton says. “There will still be a cut in provider reimbursement, short of a special session.”
  • “Not only are going after seniors and people who need home care, we’re also going after the women – and men,” Sifton says while talking with Sen. Jill Schupp.
  • “Moving the 27 point down to 24, and making a choice about if we want to go to 21, I agree with you. These are choices that have been imposed upon us,” Sen. Schupp says. “These are choices that we would not have been forced to make a couple of years ago.”
  • Sen. Rob Schaaf says everyone should think of their mothers, who could need the level of care that is being cut and imagine them not being able to get it.
  • “Where are we going to get the money?” Schaaf asked.
  • “We already have it in the supplemental,” Sifton exclaimed.
  • Schaaf says he isn’t going to filibuster but will vote against the bill, saying that HB 10 and 11 will still pass. He says he’ll be “sad and ashamed” that he was a part of it.
  • “We’re being pennywise and pound-foolish,” Sen. Schupp says. “These are some difficult situations that we are asking people to cover.”

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

  • HB 7 – Appropriations, Departments of Economic Development; Insurance, Financial Institutions and Professional Registration; and Labor and Industrial Relations
  • “We went into conference with no GR, some of the members gave up a lot,” Brown says. “A lot of these things had a major reduction.”
  • Holsman notes that the House had adjourned until Monday and that if the Senate does not complete the budget bills, they will force a special session.
  • Brown notes that people on both sides of the aisle were giving up items they wanted in order to get the budget balanced in the short time frame, saying the Senate had 17 legislative days to do their work.
  • Senate passes HB 7 with a vote of 30-3,  Schupp, Sifton, and Wallingford opposing.
  • HB 8 – Appropriations, Department of Public Safety
  • Sen. Jason Holsman asks Sen. Brown “did my little sandbagger make it?” “Yes it did,” Brown said with a laugh. “I think the weather did help you a lot.”
  • Brown says the funding for the Blue Alert was important, but even more important was protecting Amber Alert.
  • “Do we have to pass the Blue Alert bill to continue having the Amber Alert in operation?” Sen. Rob Schaaf asked. Sen. Brown responds that he’s unsure exactly how that would play out.
  • HB 6 passes with a unanimous vote of 33-0.
  • HB 9 – Appropriations, Department of Corrections
  • Senate passes the bill with no debate and a final vote of 31-1, Wieland opposing.
  • HB 10 – Appropriations, Department of Mental Health, Board of Public Buildings, and Department of Health and Senior Services
  • Sen. Dan Brown discusses the decisions made in the conference committee, and how the two groups managed to reach a level of care at 24 points instead of 27. The agreement still allows for a 21 point count if the Senate passes the circuit breaker repeal.

2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

  • The Senate returns to session at 2:10 p.m. and receives messages from the House, who has third read and passed HB 6-11. Sen. Dan Brown moves for the adoption of HB 6.
  • HB 6 – Appropriations, Departments of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Conservation
  • Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal inquires of Sen. Jill Schupp, talking about the cuts in funding from the budget for the buyout of homes affected by radioactive waste in the St. Louis area. The budget conference committee had agreed to cut that number from $3 million to $1 million.
  • “In this particular case, we’re picking and choosing who lives and who dies,” Sen. Chappelle-Nadal said. She says she has little faith in the Department of Natural Resources at this time.
  • “I may be nice, but the likelihood is that I’m not going to be,” Chappelle-Nadal says, telling the Senate what would happen if any further deviations in funding for her priority.
  • Sen. Dan Brown responds to her, saying that he believes she has accomplished more in talking about the issue and drawing attention to it is more important than the dollars. He says the opportunity is there to continue building on it.
  • “We’ve waited for 70 years,” she says, her voice cracking with emotion. She goes on to talk about generations of people who have lived there, telling the story of one woman who said: “all she can do is pray.”
  • Brown urges her “not to sell herself short” and commends her for her work.
  • After speaking for more than a half hour, Chappelle-Nadal sits down and allows the Senate to call roll for a vote.
  • “I’m keeping you at your promise,” Sen. Chappelle-Nadal tells Sen. Brown, to which he chuckles. “I will hunt you down.”
  • HB 6 passes with a vote of 29-4 with Chappelle-Nadal, Kraus, Schupp, and Sifton opposed.
  • SCS for HB 14 – appropriate money for the supplemental for departments and offices of the state is signed.

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

  • HB 3 – Appropriations, Higher Education (continued)
  • The Senate votes the bill through with a final vote of 29-4, with Sens. Holsman, Hummel, Schupp and Sifton in opposition.
  • HB 4 – Appropriations, Department of Transportation and Revenue
  • Sen. Brown says a number of the changes made to this bill came from the difference of opinions on the usage of “E’s” on line items. Rep. Scott Fitzpatrick had made a point of eliminating them in the budget.
  • The bill passes with a constitutional majority of 31-2, with Hummel and Kraus voting “no”.
  • Kehoe asks for messages from the House, secretary responds that House has agreed to HB 5 and 6.
  • HB 5 – Appropriations, Office of Administration and Department of Public Safety
  • Sen. Brown says that one of the big wins was the increased funding for MOSERS, which the House agreed to the Senate’s position on.
  • The Senate third reads and passes HB 5 with a vote of 29-3, with Sens. Eigel, Kraus and Schupp opposing.
  • Kehoe moves to go to the order of announcements – says they’ll take a short lunhc break until 1:30 p.m. to give House more time.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

  • The Senate discussion turns to the budget while on resolutions, with Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal discussing funding being cut from legislation she had sponsored. Sen. Rob Schaaf says that if Sen. Ryan Silvey had not been kept off the conference committee, maybe it would have gone differently.
  • Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard receives reports from standing committees at 11:15 a.m.
  • Senate receives messages from the House at 11:24 a.m.

 

  • CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORTS (on budget)
  • HB 2 – Appropriations, Elementary and Secondary Education
  • Sen. Dan Brown rises for a privileged motion. He moves that the conference committee report for HB 2 be taken up for adoption.
  • Sen. Schaaf inquires of Sen. Kehoe as to whether the intent was to work on Friday. Kehoe said he would like to see the budget finished and then move on to Senate bills for perfection.
  • Sen. Brown moves for the adoption, it passes unanimously with a vote of 33-0.
  • HB 3 – Appropriations, Higher Education
  • Brown moves the Senate take up HB 3, Sen. Jason Holsman asks about programs like DACA that had lost funding in the conference committees, to which Brown replies there wasn’t enough general revenue for everything.
  • “We got a pretty good haircut on some of these,” Brown said.

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

  • The Senate reconvenes at 10:40 a.m.
  • Senator Mike Kehoe puts forward a resolution granting usage of a room in September, it passes with a voice vote.
  • Sen. Doug Libla provides an update on flooding, the chamber holds a moment of silence for lives lost. Sen. Kehoe tells of a video showing a house being washed into a bridge and destroyed. He said that house had been located at the corner of his family’s farm in Jerome.

 

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

  • The Senate attempts to move to next order of business, Sen. Ryan Silvey calls for a point of order, saying that the next order of business would be to receive the reports of standing committees.
  • Sen. Kehoe moves that the Senate stand in recess until 3 p.m.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

  • The Senate continues their debate over the list put forward by Schaaf and other senators for over an hour.
  • Sen. Silvey files a resolution that would bracket the words “President Pro Tem” and replace them with “Lt. Gov.”, essentially putting the Lt. Gov. in charge of ruling on points of order.

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

    • Senate supposed to return to session at 10 a.m., but as of 10:20 a.m., only Sen. Jason Holsman can be seen sitting at his desk on the floor.
    • Confirmed: Senate Majority Floor Leader Mike Kehoe is in the building today after being stuck the past two days due to flooding.
    • As of 10:48 a.m., Sen. Kehoe is seen walking onto the Senate floor, and one minute later, the Senate gavels in.
    • Roll called at 10:50 a.m., minutes approved for the Tuesday session.
    • Sen. Dave Schatz asks to inquire of Sen. Rob Schaaf about a list “that a group of senators” put together involving bills for third reading that could “get the most done” as Schaaf says.

  • “The bill that we’re trying to get to is one of the priorities that the governor ran on,” Schaaf says.
  • Sen. Bob Dixon rises for a point of personal privilege, saying his comments were not in response to Schatz and Schaaf’s discussion.
  • We find ourselves at this point as a Senate, and I mean this in the most sincere way… I think that every member I have talked to wants to see this body function,” Dixon says, saying he would like to share some “tidbits of history”.
  • “The people are neck-deep water, and I submit that we are neck-deep in something else,” Dixon says.

 

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

10:00 a.m. – 1o:10 a.m.

  • Motion to stand adjourned sustained at 10:10 a.m.
  • Silvey had words for Senate leadership

Monday, May 1, 2017

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

    • The Senate is still standing at ease.
    • Sen. Ryan Silvey tweets at 5:13 p.m. saying “The Senate is currently at ease deciding how important REAL ethics reform is. Seems like it might be pretty important.”

  • Senate returns to session at 5:30 p.m., Sens. Holsman withdraws his motion and Schaaf withdraws his amendment.
  • Schaaf says the reason for the delay is the push for ethics reform.
  • “We are standing up for the integrity of the Senate, we are standing up for the integrity of the Constitution, nothing less,” Schaaf says.
  • At 5:35 p.m. Sen. Doug Libla requests a point of personal privilege to acknowledge the devastating floodwaters affecting the state, asks everyone to keep those affected in their thoughts and prayers.
  • At 5:48 p.m., the Senate receives messages from the House. The secretary reads off all of the House picks for the budget conference.

  • Sen. Dan Brown moves that the Senate refuse to receive the House position on the budget bills, and send the two chambers to a conference on the budget. The motions pass.
  • The Senate announces the budget conference conferees. Sen. Ryan Silvey, the vice chair of the Senate appropriations committee, was not named to any of the conference committees.
  • Sen. Schaaf points it out on the floor, implying that Silvey was “being spanked for doing the right thing for kids”.
  • Senate adjourns at 6:11 p.m.

 

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

  • The Senate returns to session at 4 p.m. and agrees to approve the calendar. Sen. Rob Schaaf moves to correct an item in the calendar, placing a hyphen in between the words “University of Missouri” and “Kansas City”.
  • Sen. Mike Kehoe is absent from the floor today, Senate staff confirms he is unable to get here because of the high waters.
  • Sen. Bob Onder is running the floor and attempted to stand at ease, moving that the Senate recess until 4 p.m.
  • The Senate, as of 4:20 p.m., has come to a stall as they are now tied up in parliamentary procedures.
  • Sen. Onder withdraws his motion, then moves that the Senate stand at ease.
  • “Mr. President, you need unanimous consent to stand at ease,” one senator is heard saying.
  • The Senate has gone quiet, with nothing happening on the floor but side conversations since 4:24 p.m.
  • Lt. Gov. Mike Parson bangs the gavel at 4:57 p.m., reminding the senators that “the rules are still in place” when at ease.
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