Hanaway, on client’s behalf, partially complies with subpoena, turns over ‘substantial number’ of documents

  

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — The special committee investigating Gov. Eric Greitens is looking into their options on enforcing their subpoena power after Catherine Hanaway, on behalf of her clients, only partially complied with the request, according to the committee’s chairman. 

The House Special Investigative Committee on Oversight was scheduled for a noon meeting on Monday. Following a bad traffic accident on I-70 that caused some members to be unable to attend, the meeting was canceled. It would have been the first meeting open to the public and media, excluding the first procedural meeting.

Rep. Jay Barnes did provide a quick update to those in attendance, saying the committee took Catherine Hanaway, legal counsel for Greitens for Missouri, up on her promise following the release of the second House report.

“[Barnes] ought to ask the campaign for its version of events before acting as judge and jury in a matter that was settled long ago,” Hanaway said in a statement. She also alleged he “did not allow the campaign an opportunity to be heard. He never asked the campaign to testify before his committee, nor did he request that the campaign provide any documents to his Committee.”

Following Hanaway’s promise that her clients would cooperate with subpoenas for production of documents and testimony, House Speaker Todd Richardson and the committee issued subpoenas to Greitens for Missouri, A New Missouri, and Austin Chambers.

“Unfortunately, after having promised to be fully open and fully transparent, Hanaway responded by providing some documents that were responsive to our subpoena. She also objected to other large categories of documents,” said Barnes. “We are in the process of reviewing the documents that were provided to this committee, of which there was a substantial number. And we are considering our options on which path to take to enforce the legislature and this committee subpoena power. When we decide what we will do, in furtherance of that, we will provide an update.”

Alisha Shurr is a reporter for the Missouri Times and Missouri Times Magazine. She joined the Missouri Times in January 2018 after working as a copy editor for her hometown newspaper in Southern Oregon. Alisha is a graduate of Kansas State University. Contact Alisha at alisha@themissouritimes.com.