JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — In the right-to-work battleground of Missouri, individuals and organizations are not being shy about donating thousands of dollars to promote their cause. And the committee campaigning against the measure is on pace bring in more $13 million this cycle.

In the last 48 hours, We Are Missouri, a political action committee opposed to RTW, took in more than $1 million in donations. Just looking at donations greater than $5,000 since the committees start in 2017, more than $13.6 million has been donated to the effort.

“We are pleased with the financial support we’ve received and think it shouldn’t come as a surprise that an organization that supports workers would invest in a campaign that supports working families,” said We Are Missouri. “Anyone who is trying to point at campaign finance reports is only trying to distract from the fact that Proposition A drives down wages and fails to create jobs. We’ve been blown away by the energy and hard work of thousands of volunteers who are leading a grassroots, door-to-door campaign to reach voters in every corner of the state.”

The anti-RTW side isn’t the only one bringing in large amounts of donations either. Between two political action committees, proponents of RTW has taken in more than $3 million in large donations.

Freedom to Work was created in 2017, which lists supporting RTW in its statement of committee organization, has brought in roughly $2.3 million in donations. $1.65 million of which came from A New Missouri.

Missourians for Freedom to Work was formed in April 2018 to support RTW among other ballot measures. Nearly $700,000 has been donated to the committee.

Both sides are working to get Missourian to the polls to vote on Proposition A, which if approved would make the Show-Me State a Right-to-Work State.

Proponents argue that doing so would signal that Missouri is open for business, bringing jobs to the state and boosting the economy.

Opponents argue that studies disprove supporters claims, saying that RTW will lower wages of workers and diminish the power of unions.

Alisha Shurr is a reporter for the Missouri Times and Missouri Times Magazine. She joined the Missouri Times in January 2018 after working as a copy editor for her hometown newspaper in Southern Oregon. Alisha is a graduate of Kansas State University. Contact Alisha at alisha@themissouritimes.com.