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The Final Week: Hourly update of the Missouri House

  

The Missouri Times is grateful for readers who followed our hourly updates during the final week of session. Please let us know if you have any feedback! Also, thank you John Combest who published links to both update pages each day this week.

If you have any feedback, email ashley@themissouritimes.com, or tweet us at @MissouriTimes. 

Friday, May 17

6 p.m. the House has adjourned for session.

6 p.m. floor update

House Bill 152 — Allows school districts to authorize and commission school officers to enforce laws relating to crimes committed on school grounds, at school activities, and on school buses.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bills with Senate Amendments:

House Bill 505 — This bill changes the laws regarding child abuse and neglect.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Bills in Conference:

Senate Bill 224 — This bill is designed to increase the maximum salary payable to the chief of Police Officers in the Kansas City Police Department.

  • A controversial amendment making the KCPD a Right to Work organization was removed in conference. Read the other Amendments here.
  • The conference committee report was passed by the body.

Senate Bill 100 — Adds interest in health savings plans and inherited accounts to the list of exemptions in bankruptcy proceedings.

  • The conference committee report was passed by the body.

Senate Bill 51 — Modifies provisions relating to the laws regulating motor vehicles.

  • The conference committee report was passed by the body.

House Bills with Senate Amendments:

House Bill 110 — This bill changes the laws regarding elections, including writs of election, vacancies in statewide offices, elimination of certain primary elections in third class cities, the date of the presidential primary, and the automatic recount of votes.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 77 — Allows for certain neighborhood youth development programs to be exempt from childcare licensing agreements.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 28 — Authorizes any county commission, municipality or fire protection district to adopt an order or ordinance, including a burn ban order, regarding its emergency management functions as they relate to a natural or man-made disaster.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 342 — This bill raises the loan amount available through the Missouri agricultural and small business development authority for livestock feed and crop input from forty thousand to one hundred thousand dollars

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

HB 116 — Changes the laws regarding county government account audits and specifies that the expenses incurred by the State Auditor while conducting the audit must be paid for by the county or county commission

  • The body moved to reconsider the emergency clause on this bill. The clause was adopted.

5 p.m. floor update

Senate Bills for third Reading:

Senate Bill 210 — Requires the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to hold public meetings in each congressional district on the Common Core State Standards.

  • There were some debate on this bill. Rep Genise Monticello spent several minutes inquiring house handler and opposer of common core, Rep. Kurt Bahr, and accusing him of attempting to undermine the implementation of common core. Monticello also said she’s had several meetings with DESE over the implementation of common core, and that the bill was not necessary.
  • After lengthy debate, the measure was truly agreed and finally passed by a vote of 123-28.

Senate Bill 258 — Reduces the membership of Kansas City School District board of education changes the election date for school board members.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 121 – This bill modifies provisions of the liquor control laws and allows home brewers to sell their product at certain events.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

SJR 14 — This joint resolution, modifying and reinforcing the right of Missouri citizens to keep and bears, was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House bills with Senate Amendment:

House Bill 215 — This bill has a number of new provisions dealing with judicial procedures and caseloads, as well as other language relating to domestic violence.

  • The bill was truly agreed on and finally passed

House Bill 184 — Authorizes Pettis County to use revenue from the county’s transient guest tax on salaries.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed

House Bill 301 — This bill adds the prosecutor of the jurisdiction into which a sexually violent predator is to be released is the list of those who must be served the offenders petition for conditional release over specified objections.

  • This bill has a number of House amendments, read them here.
  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

4 p.m. floor update

House Bills with Senate Amendments:

House Bill 116 — This bill changes the laws regarding county government account audits and specifies that the expenses incurred by the State Auditor while conducting the audit must be paid for by the county or county commission

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

HJR 16 — This proposes a constitutional amendment allowing relevant evidence of prior criminal acts to be admissible in prosecutions for crimes of a sexual nature involving a victim under 18 years of age.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 128 — Requires collectors in all counties, except for counties under township organization, to mail or electronically send property tax bills 30 days before the taxes are delinquent.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 722 — This bill changes laws regarding the St. Louis City Police Department pensions system.

  • The bill was tryly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

Senate Bill 120 — Allows members of public governmental bodies to cast roll call votes in a meeting if the member is participating via videoconferencing.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 210 — Requires the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to hold public meetings in each congressional district on the Common Core State Standards.

  • There were some debate on this bill. Rep Genise Monticello spent several minutes inquiring house handler and opposer of common core, Rep. Kurt Bahr, and accusing him of attempting to undermine the implementation of common core. Monticello also said she’s had several meetings with DESE over the implementation of common core, and that the bill was not necessary.
  • Debate continues, and the bill is currently before the body.

3 p.m. floor update

House Bill 322 — This bill allows the insurance identification card that contains proof of insurance information for a motor vehicle and certain policies and endorsements to be available electronically.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 533 — This bill modifies laws related to the use of firearms during the commission of a felony.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed

HB 142 — This bill specifies that the exclusion from eligibility in any demand-side program offered by an electrical corporation of certain tax credits will not apply to low-income programs and their participants.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 345 — Establishes the Unifrom Wireless Communications Infrastructure Deployment Act.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 196 — This bill requires the Department of Economic Development to establish the Missouri Works Training Program to assist in qualified companies with the training of employees in new or retrained jobs.

  • The Bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 428 — Allows an insurer that purchases a motor vechile or trailer, subjet to a lien, through the claims adjustment process to apply for a salvage title or junking certificate without obtaining a lien release.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 148 — Establishes the custody and visitation rights of a deploying military parent.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 175 — This bill changes the laws regarding the collection of special assessments and delinquent property taxes.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 611 — This bill modifies laws regarding unemployment compensation.

  • The bill was truly agreed and finally passed.

2 p.m. (late) floor update

The House Computers crashed for some time, delaying debate considerably as all votes are electronically recorded. They are currently functioning.

House Bills with Senate Amendments:

House Bill 351 — This bill modifies provisions relating to hospital licensure and inspections.

  • Rep. Vicki Englund attempted to note the lack of a quorum when debate resumed. Speaker Pro Tem Jason Smith, who was on the dais, told she was “not recognized,” for that motion. Rep. Jay Swearingen tried for several minutes to call a point of order, but was never recognized.
  • According to the House rules, refusing to  the quorum call once the motion has been made is a violation of House rules. However, Swearingen was never able to call his point of order on the rule violation, because Smith did not recognize him.
  • The bill was truly agreed and finally passed.

House Bill 58 — This bill modifies laws regarding portable electronics insurance.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

 1 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 330 — This bill modifies provisions relating to collaborative practice arrangements between a physician and an advanced practice registered nurse by allowing a waiver to the proximity requirement.

  • The conference committee report was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 17 — This bill establishes the Career and Technical Education Advisory Council. IT also includes Bryce’s Law, dealing with funding education of autistic children, as an amendment.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 43 — Increases the weight allowance for vehicles equipped with idle reduction technology from 400 pounds to 550 pounds to reflect change in federal law.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 42 — This bill allows setoff of income tax refunds and lottery payouts for unpaid debts to county jails and bars debtors from holding a concealed carry endorsement or license to hunt or fish.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 161 — This bill requires the joint Committee on Legislative Research to conduct an actuarial anaylsis to study the cost impact of mandating health insurance coverage for eating disorders.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finaly passed.

Senate Bill 127 — This bill authorizes a statewide dental delivery system under MO Healthnet.

  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 248 — This bill requires notice of neighborhood improvement districts be filed with the recorder of deeds.

  • The bill is currently before the body.

 12 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Bills in Conference:

House Bill 256/33/305 — This language deals with certain expirations dates related to the Open Records and Meetings Law.

  • The conference committee report was adopted and third read by the body.

Senate Bill 33 – This bill modifies a number of provisions dealing with the rights of people with mental disabilities.

  • The conference committee report was adopted and truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bill 103 — This bill allows municipalities to adopt resolutions that allow all-terrain and utility vehicles to operate on the streets and highways under its jurisdiction.

  • The bill was adopted and third read by the body.

Senate Bill 327 — This bill would allow certain criminal defendants to be released on electronic monitoring if the county commission agrees to pay the cost of the monitoring.

  • The conference committee substitute was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 262 — This bill would prohibit health carriers from denying coverage for a health care service on the basis that the service was provided through telemedicine if the same service would be covered when in person.

  • Several Amendments dealing with both coverage and certain types of insurance policies were added over time. Read them here.
  • The conference committee substitute was adopted and truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 157/102 — This is legislation aimed at modifying the purchases of scrap metal.

  • The bill is currently before the body.

11 a.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Bills in Conference:

House Bill 1035 — This bill would change the law regarding amended property tax rate filings with the Office of the State Auditor and repeal the expiration date of the provision requiring certain counties and the City of St. Louis to deduct a percentage of property taxes collections for assessment costs.

  • The Conference Committee Substitute for the bill was adopted and third read.

House Bill 336 — This bill, which was originally designed to protect the right of first responders to engage in political activity when not in uniform on working, was amended early on to include language making certain police departments Right to Work organizations. However, the language was removed in conference and the conference committee substitute was adopted and third read by the body.

House Bill 698 — This bill, which has broad language dealing with tax programs that includes Angel Investor Tax Credits, Data Collection Centers and others, also includes caps on existing programs, like the Historic Preservation Tax Credit, which was cut by 50 million dollars. The conference committee report was adopted and third read  by the body.

House Bill 117 — This bill changes the law regarding petition circulators and the duties of the Secretary of State regarding initiative and referendum petitioners. The Conference Committee Report was adopted and third read by the body.

House Bill 374 — Allows for the Missouri Supreme Court to transfer circuit and associate judge positions from one circuit to another. This bill also deals with the redrawing of circuit court districts.

  • The bill is currently before the body.

Thursday, May 16 

8p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Bills in Conference

House Bill 336 — The House refused to adopt substitutes from the Senate on this bill and requested the senate recede from its position or grant a conference.

House Bill 307 — This bill dealing with fire protection district boards came out of conference and was accepted by the body.

Senate Bill 36 — The body moved to accept the conference committee report on this bill, dealing with juvenile offenders who have been certified as adults and found guilty in a court of general jurisdiction

Conference Committee’s Announced:

Senate Bill 89 — This bill would allow nursing home districts to establish and maintain senior housing in any third or fourth classification county. It successfully moved through the body.

Conference Committee’s Announced

Conference on House Bill 336: Hinson, Hough, Monticello

Floor Leader John Diehl announced the following bills were still “in play,” and awaiting final conference committee reports:
Senate Bills: 24, 224, 342, 12, 100, 114, 45.
House Bills: 103, 698, 336

The House will stand adjourned until 10a.m. Friday, May 17.

7 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

 

Senate Bill 241 — This bill modifies provisions relating to infrastructure facilities of wireless communications utilities.

  • After choosing to reject the current House committee substitute of the bill and amend the Senate substitute, debates arouse.
  • Debate became contentious when Rep. Funderburk took the floor to condemn the bill having provisions removed at the behest of “interests far outside this building.” Funderburk said that House handler Rep. Mike Cierpiot and a small number of supporters deliberately adopted the older version of the bill at the last minute in order to have amendments ready for the old language that would cost ratepayers more money. Funderburk openly accused Cierpiot of obfuscating the committee process by adopting language never approved by his Utilities committee. By adopting the older language, Cierpiot would be the only individual on the floor with amendments appropriately prepared. His amendment, which was strongly opposed by Funderburk, removes a provision allowing ratepayers to collect overpayment on ISRS development.
  • Rep. Brandon Ellington moved, under House rule 78, to have the bill recommitted to Funderburk’s committee because of a “total lack of clarity,” on the bill.

“Nobody understands what’s happening with this bill,” Ellington said. “I knew the motion wouldn’t pass, because you can’t send something back to a committee with less than 24 hours to go in the session, but I think it’s the right thing, clearly we don’t know enough about this thing to vote on it.

The bill is still before the body

 

6 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 112 — This bill reauthorizes the New Market Tax Credit program and modifies some of its provisions. There are several amendments dealing with land assemblage and other economic issues attached. Read them HERE.

  • House Speaker Tim Jones took the floor to offer one of many amendments dealing with tax credit reforms. Jones said that, once complete, the bill would include a number of changes to the state tax credits that mirrored many of Gov. Nixon’s own tax credit commission’s proposals.

The bill passed by a vote of 120-33.

Senate Bill 241 — This bill modifies provisions relating to infrastructure facilities deployment, specifically dealing with wireless communication.

  • After choosing to reject the current House committee substitute of the bill and amend the Senate substitute, the House remains on the topic.
  • Debate became contentious when Rep. Funderburk took the floor to condemn the switch to the Senate substitute bill, which Funderburk said never came through his committee, and he was never made aware of. Funderburk spent several minutes railing against the House handler of the bill, Rep. Mike Cierpiot, for “going around,” the committee process and “cutting a deal,” with interests who were “not even affected by the bill.” Funderburk said the decision to switch bills was part of a larger deal making process on the bill that was “totally wrong and totally inappropriate.”
  • The bill is currently still on the floor.

5 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

Senate Bill 251 — This bill modifies access and regulations related to public assistance funds. The bill took considerable time for debate.

  • Supporters: They say the bill is meant to reduce fraud by restricting where the funds can be used. They argue that welfare fraud and waste is costing the taxpayers too much money.
  • Opponents: They argued that fraud was relatively minimal and that the ban on using funds is too broad. They argued that individuals trying to purchase approved items might be unable to because the items are being sold at a liquor store, rather than a traditional grocery store.
  • After lengthy debate the bill was third read by a vote of 110-36.

Senate Bill 112 — This bill reauthorizes the New Market Tax Credit program and modifies some of its provisions. There are several amendments dealing with land assemblage and other economic issues attached. Read them here.

  • The bill is currently before the body.

4 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 100 — This bill deals with language relating to bankruptcy claims and inheritance. However, as with many bills in the final week, many amendments have been pre-filed.

Senate Bill 12 — This bill would provide immunity from civil liability to court appointed attorneys.

  • This bill has several amendments attached and dozens pre-filed. Read them here.

3 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Conference Updates:

  • HB117: Dugger, Crawford, Conway 10

Senate Bill 342 — The House refused to recede from its position and granted the Senate a conference committee.

House Bill 103 — The House refused to adopt the Senate committee substitute to their bill, and requested the senate recede from its position or grant them a conference committee.

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

Senate Bill 24 — This bill, originally drafted to exempt certain agricultural structures in third and fourth-class counties from certain building codes, upon voter approval.

  • The bill was laid over from earlier thanks to a large number of amendments. It is now before the body. Read the amendments here.

12 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 1 — This bill, which deals primarily with workers compensation and includes language to repair the bankrupt Second Injury Fund, took the first hour of the House’s time and is currently being debated on the floor, however the debate is far less contentious than earlier in the session before certain compromises were fostered.

  • Debate: There was very little debate on the floor. Early, there were legitimate inquiries from Democrats looking for clarification on the language from the House bill handler, Rep. Todd Richardson.
  • House Speaker Tim Jones took the floor for some time to discuss the issue at length before the body. Both men mentioned the long-term process behind the bill, spanning across several years and several classes of representatives.
  • On the floor Jones said, should the measure pass, that it would be “one of the crowning achievements,” of this session and of his time in the House.
  • The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed by a vote of 135-23.

Senate Bill 282 — This bill increases penalties and fees for traffic and moving violations in an emergency zone.

Senate Bill 24  — This bill, originally drafted to exempt certain agricultural structures in third and fourth-class counties from certain building codes, upon voter approval.

  • Another bill with several amendments, which has kept it on the floor for debate. Read the amendments here.

The House went into recess just after 12 p.m. and will reconvene at 2 p.m.

11 a.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Bills in Conference:

Senate Bill 1 — This bill, which deals primarily with workers compensation and includes language to repair the bankrupt Second Injury Fund, took the first hour of the House’s time and is currently being debated on the floor, however the debate is far less contentious than earlier in the session before certain compromises were fostered.

Wednesday, May 15

11 p.m. floor update (By Eli Yokley)

HB 650 — This bill contains the Department of Natural Resources’s requested changes for permitting and background checks, land survey changes, changes to solid waste management districts, and language sought by Doe Run to cap lead lawsuits.

  • State Rep. Kevin Engler spoke in favor of a $2.5 million cap on lawsuits: “This is a long time going in… we’ve gotta make a choice here: are we gonna have for run around to employ people … or are we gonna have hundreds if lawsuits and allow them to hide behind bankruptcy.”
  • State Rep. Jay Barnes stood in opposition: “if the defendant’s egregiousness is as good as they say, they shouldn’t have to worry about too much.” “Nobody who calls themselves a conservative can believe that we can make such decisions with such little information.”

The bill was truly agreed and finally passed: 94-63

Senate Bill 72 – the House passed legislation that designates May as Motorcycle Safety Month.  The bill now goes to Gov. Jay Nixon’s desk.

10 p.m. floor update (By Eli Yokley)

HCS SB 42 — Third read and passed the Agriculture omnibus bill, 86-68. During the 9 p.m. hour, they added amendments that would:

  • create a tax credit for charcoal producers
  • strengthen cattle wrestling rules,
  • and add a $5 million tax credit for dairy farmers.

House Bill 542 — The body passed this bill 139-15 that would expand the definition of eggs. The language has been included on several other bills and already signed by Gov. Jay Nixon.

9 p.m. floor update (By Eli Yokley)

HCS SB 42 — The Missouri House of Representatives spent much of the hour debating its agriculture omnibus bill. Key provisions include:

  • new tax exemptions for farmer markets
  • a new advisory council for agricultural vocational education
  • requires county commissions and county health commissions to have the same position on communicable diseases
  • redefines eggs to include turkey, duck, goose, or guinea eggs for human consumption
  • changes the governing structure of University of Missouri Extension districts
  • guarantees the right to rodeo
  • allows for children to work on family farms
  • makes stealing livestock a felony

Opponents – 
Democrats stood up and were critical of what the bill might do to expand the rights of concentrated animal feeding operations.

Supporters –
Republicans believe local elected officials should make rules for agriculture, not unelected health boards.

Post-recess update (8:20 p.m.) 

The House reconvened at 8:06 pm.

Senate bills for third reading:

House Bill 342 — This bill would exempt certain products sold at farmers markets from sales and use taxes.

The House will stand in recess until 7:45 pm.

6 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 83 — with more than 35 amendments and more than 2 hours of debate, was defeated handily on the House floor with 115 votes against.

Announcements

5 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 83 — The House is still debating SB 83, as many of the 100 pre-filed amendments are attached.

4 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Conference Committees Announced:

  • Conference Committee on SB 51: Guernsey, Fraker, Curtis
  • Conference Committee on SB 114: Caleb Jones, Richardson, Hummel
  • Conference Committee on SB 256: Torpey, Hinson, McManus

House Joint Resolutions for Third Reading:

HJR 17 — This resolution would restrict spending of the state to a strict formula based on the inflation rate every year and the percentage of population change. The limits on spending would place any excess funds into an emergency fund.

  • Supporters: They say it has no impact on revenue, but will make long term budget decisions much easier as spending can be predicted on a long scale. They also say the excess funds placed in the “rainy day,” fund, will help pay down debt and lead to greater spending stability.
  • Opponents: They claim the bill is too inflexible in the rate of growth, and won’t take into account changing costs of larger industries expected to come, like health care. Opponents also criticized the hesitance to dedicate the “rainy day,” fund directly to the foundation formula, which remains underfunded.
  • Rep. Chris Kelly, a longtime Democrat, rose for several minutes to blast his own party for opposing “a smart, common sense resolution to stabilize our state government.” Floor Leader John Diehl immediately moved the previous question after Kelly’s tirade.

The resolution was Third Read by a vote of 111-50.

Senae Bills for Third Reading:

Senate Bill 83 — A bill dealing with political subdivisions, exactly 100 amendments have been offered on the bill. Read them here.

  • Amendments on the bill include provisions dealing with the Use Tax, the transfer of easements, new home income tax deductions and the angel investment incentive act.
  • The amendment passed. The measure is still being debated as a large number of amendments are being added.

3 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

The House returned from recess at 2:06 p.m.

Conference Updates:

Senate Bill 51 — The House refused to recede from its position and the bill was sent into conference.

Senate Bill 114 — The House refused to recede from its position and granted the motion of the Senate to go into conference.

Read our coverage here, here, here and here.

Senate Bill 256 — The House refused to recede from its position and granted the Senate a conference.

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

Senate Bill 224 — This bill is designed to increase the maximum salary payable to the chief of Police Officers in the Kansas City Police Department.

  • A large number of amendments have been offered on this bill. You can read them here.
  • A House substitute amendment offered by Rep. Rehder would, by Rehder’s admission, make the Kansas City Police Department a right-to-work organization.
  • Supporters: They say this amendment expands the right of employment for individuals wishing to work in the Kansas City Police Department without being required to join their union. Republicans said Democrats voting against the measure were more concerned with enhancing union power than providing work to individual citizens.
  • Opposition: They say this right weakens the essential services that unions provide to public employees, such as the right to collective bargaining, which ultimately result in lower wages and less economic advantages. Rep. Roorda and fellow Democrats chided the bill for being a violation of the right to free association.
  • This amendment dealing with Right to Work was debated for about ten minutes before Floor Leader John Diehl called the previous question and ended debate.

The amendment passed by a vote of 85-71

1 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

The House is in recess until 2 p.m.

12 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 73 — This bill would prohibit the establishment of motorcycle-only checkpoints, or any other checkpoints targeting a specific vehicle type. The second provision in the bill allows for an individual to take part in a DWI court regardless of residency, meaning an individual from Jefferson City who is ticketed for a DWI in the city of Saint Louis may take part in the DWI court in Saint Louis and not Jefferson City.

  • After several amendments dealing with motorcycles brought debate to a crawl, the bill was eventually third read and passed.

Senate Bill 118 — This bill establishes the creation of veteran treatment courts. Circuit courts would be empowered to create them in dealing with current or former military personnel in dealing with mental illness or substance abuse.

The bill passed with no significant opposition

Senate Bill 224 — This bill is designed to increase the maximum salary payable to the chief of Police Officers in the Kansas City Police Department.

  • An amendment which would allow individual found guilty of criminal non-support (failure to pay child support being the most common) to have the record expunged after 8 years slowed down debate considerably. The bill is currently before the body.

11 a.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Introduction of special Guests:

  • Brief introductions of special guests

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

SB 381 — This bill would create the Innovation Education Campus fund to provide funds for campuses that meet certain requirements. The fund will provide money for campuses that partner high schools or school districts with a four-year institution of higher learning, a Missouri business and a two-year institution of higher education or technical training. According to the supporters of the bill, it will expand and secure such campuses, which provide immediate real-world experience and a hate rate of employment after graduation.

The bill was truly agreed and finally passed with no significant opposition.

SB 73 — This bill would prohibit the establishment of motorcycle-only checkpoints, or any other checkpoints targeting a specific vehicle type. The second provision in the bill allows for an individual to take part in a DWI court regardless of residency, meaning an individual from Jefferson City who is ticketed for a DWI in the city of Saint Louis may take part in the DWI court in Saint Louis and not Jefferson City.

  • Amendments have been added and the bill is currently being debated on the floor.

Tuesday, May 14

7 p.m. floor update — House has adjourned for the night  (By Collin Reischman)

Conference Committee Report

Senate Bill 330 — This bill dealing with “tele-abortions,” or abortion-related services that take place over electronic devices because of physical distance, was sent back to conference committee.

Senate Bill 45 — The House refused to recede from its position on a judicial procedure bill and requested a conference committee on the measure.

Senate Bill 161 — An underlying bill which would require a study to determine the cost of adding eating disorders to the list of covered illnesses under health insurance was sent to conference as a number of amendments dealing with larger insurance issues were added by the Senate. The bill was sent to conference.

Senate Bill 127 — The bill dealing with dental health as it relates to MO Healthnet had an amendment, which needed work, according to members on the floor. The bill was sent to conference to deal with the amendment.

Senate Bill 248 — A bill dealing with neighborhood improvement districts has wording issues that need fixing. The bill was sent to conference because of a slight wording change that is needed.

House bills 374/454 — A bill dealing with the redrawing of judicial districts has some amendments that the House refused to adopt. The House officially requested a conference committee on the bill.

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

Senate Bill 51 — This omnibus transportation bill makes several changes to motor vehicle law including consequences for texting will driving a commercial vehicle, prohibits motorcycle-only checkpoints, as well as language modifying license plate tabs, anti-masking provisions and language to comply with Federal Motor Carrier safety regulations.

The measure passed it’s Third Reading in the House

Conference Committees Appointed:

  • Conference for SB 45: Hough, Elmer, Colona
  • Conference for SB 127: Lichteneggar, Barnes, Kirkton
  • Conference for SB 161: Stream, Richardson, McNeil
  • Conference for SB 248: Fraker, Crawford, Kratky
  • Conference for SB 327: Haar, Cornejo, Roorda
  • Conference for SB 330: Burlison, Keeny, Kratky

6 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 99 — An omnibus election bill, this legislation would, among other provisions, reduce the minimum age for election eligibility for the position of alderman in a fourth class city from 21 to 18, as well as reducing the number of days an election commissioner has to remove names of the deceased from the list of registered voter. The bill has a number of wide-ranging provisions relating to the use of paper ballots, records of registered voters as well as language clarifying the use of absentee ballots under various circumstances.

The passed with no significant opposition.

Senate Bill 125 — The bill, a much-watered down version of the defeated education bill from last week, carves out a number of provisions added into the House committee substitute of the bill. The version reverts back to the Senate version of the bill, which carves out all of the controversial evaluations. The bill includes language allowing for the termination of tenured teachers in the City of Saint Louis based on incompetency and allows for a teacher to be placed in probationary status more easily. The bill was ultimately stripped of much of its language and deals almost exclusively with the districts of Kansas City and Saint Louis City.

  • The bill took significant floor time, as supporters had to amend into the older senate version of the bill all the language they were interested in passing that was defeated in the House version of the bill.
  • More than 25 members of both sides of the aisle that previously rejected the House version of the measure voted to approve the underlying bill, giving it more than 100 votes. The bill was successful largely because the majority of controversial provisions dealing with teacher and administrator evaluations, as well as the emergency clause, were removed from the bill.

(Last week’s SB125 story.)

5 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 110 — This bill deals with shared custody and visitation rights of military personnel. The bill received little significant opposition and a House committee subtitute was successfully third read and passed.

Senate Bill 302 — This bill, largely inspired by the Joplin tornado, allows for short term prescriptions for emergency medication to be dispensed without prior authorization from the prescriber in certain situations.

The bill passed by a vote of 142-8

4 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 256 — An omnibus bill dealing with child abuse, this legislation features several provisions, including extending the time period for which a parent may leave their child in the care of a medical professional at a hospital without fear of prosecution. The bill also establishes a task force on the prevention of the sexual abuse of children, as well as new provisions for the handling of meningococcal diseases on college campuses.

  • Brief tensions arose on the floor when an amendment was attached dealing with the expansion of bullying definitions.
  • Some members were concerned because the language wouldn’t allow individual districts to enumerate protected classes under the new bullying language. The same members said the bill simply had no chance of passing the senate with the new bullying language.
  • The debate around the amendment dealing with bullying kept the debate going for some time. However, the measure was eventually approved with amendments.

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

Senate Bill 252 — This bill, drafted during the ongoing DOR scandal, would prohibit the Department of Revenue from retaining source documents required to obtain drivers licenses. The bill specifically prohibits the retention of digital copies of documents needed to acquire a conceal carry permit, which supporters said was necessary to statutorily prohibit, given growing uncertainty with regard to the DOR scanning of certain personally identifiable information.

Several amendments, dealing with impeaching department heads and allowing for litigation related to document retention were offered and, after lengthy debate, added to the bill.

The bill is currently on the floor for debate.

3 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

Senate Bill 236 — This bill requires a specific fund for the Missouri Highway Patrol to purchase large pieces of equipment including cars, aircraft and watercraft. The fund would require the highway patrol to receive a specific appropriation for any purchase on a unit which costs more than $100,000.

  • Supporters: They says this keeps Highway Patrol accountable to the legislative oversight process through budgetary review. Large equipment purchases are very expensive and supporters argue they should be subject to legislative review to keep money from being wasted.
  • Opponents: They say this bill puts far too restrictive measures on the highway patrol as it relates to purchasing necessary equipment. Several Democratic representatives were worried that the bill would make the department less nimble and less able to adjust to emergency needs in terms of equipment. They also questioned the need to place such heavy restrictions on such appropriations for only this department and nothing else.

The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed by a vote of 112-42

Senate Bill 256 — An omnibus bill dealing with child abuse, this legislation features several provisions, including extending the time period for which a parent may leave their child in the care of a medical professional at a hospital without fear of prosecution. The bill also establishes a task force on the prevention of the sexual abuse of children, as well as new provisions for the handling of meningococcal diseases on college campuses.

  • Brief tensions arose on the floor when an amendment was attached dealing with the expansion of bullying definitions.

Some members were concerned because the language wouldn’t allow individual districts to enumerate protected classes under the new bullying language. The same members said the bill simply had no chance of passing the senate with the new bullying language.

The debate around the amendment dealing with bullying has kept the debate going. The bill is currently before the body.

12:15 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bills for Third Reading:

SB 222 — This bill, sponsored by Rep. Chris Kelly, D-Columbia, was largely a “fix,” bill to make small but necessary changes to provisions relating to domestic violence. The bill strengthens several provisions related to prosecuting offenders of domestic violence by expanding certain definitions, including those for stalking, coercion, and rape.

The bill passed unanimously on its third reading.

12 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

House Bills for Third Reading:

House Bill 727 — An omnibus bill dealing with disability services, which was perfected yesterday near the end of session, moved rapidly and passed with no major opposition.

House Joint Resolutions for Perfection:

HJR 17 — This resolution would restrict spending of the state to a strict formula based on the inflation rate every year and the percentage of population change. The strict limits on spending would place any excess funds into an emergency reserve funds.

  • Supporters: They say it has no impact on revenue, but will make long-term budget decisions much easier as spending can be predicted on a long scale. They also say the excess funds placed in the “rainy day,” fund, will help pay down debt and lead to greater spending stability.
  • Opponents: They claim the bill is too inflexible in the rate of growth, and won’t take into account changing costs of larger industries expected to come, like health care. Opponents also criticized the hesitance to dedicate the “rainy day,” fund directly to the foundation formula, which remains underfunded.

The bill passed by a party-line vote.

Senate Joint Resolutions for Third Reading:

SJR 16 — This resolution, if passed, would place a measure on the next general election ballot for Missouri voters. If approved by the voters, the law would increase sales and use taxes by one percent for a period of ten years, with renewal by the voters every 10 years until it is defeated. The funds raised would largely go to funding transportation needs throughout the state to fund improvements, upgrades and new projects related to commercial, residential, public and even freight transportation.

  • Supporters: They say the bill is both a job creator and an economic booster. The projects and work created by the bill, supporters say, will make Missouri business more competitive, improve transportation throughout the state and increase safety. They say carve outs for food and prescription drugs will keep the poor from paying an unfair ratio of their income.
  • Opponents: Most opponents conceded that the bill would likely create economic benefits. However, much of the opposition stemmed from the funding being collected on sales and use taxes, which they said would unfairly burden the poor and senior citizens. Opponents were particularly critical of this funding method coming on top of the recent income tax cut for some of Missouri’s wealthiest citizens.

There was bi-partisan support and opposition to the bill. Some Republicans opposed the bill as an irresponsible tax increase while some Democrats resisted imposing a sales tax on their poor constituents.

The bill passed by a vote of 100-57 with bi-partisan support.

11 a.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Bills in conference:

CCR for HJR 11, 7 — This joint resolution would establish a constitutional amendment if approved by voters “reaffirming the right of farmers and ranchers to engage in modern farming and ranching practices.”

  • The proposed ballot language would read: “Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to ensure that the right of Missouri citizens to engage in agricultural production and ranching practices shall not be infringed?”If approved, the constitution would have a new amendment reading: “That agriculture, which provides food, energy, health benefits, and security is the foundation and stabilizing force of Missouri’s economy, the right of farmers and ranchers to engage in farming and ranching practices shall be forever guaranteed in this state, subject to duly authorized powers, if any, conferred by article VI of the Constitution of Missouri.
  • The bill passed with no significant opposition.

Senate Bill 350 — The Speaker signed the “Senior Services Protection Fund,” negotiated last week during the circuit breaker tax credit debate.

Conference Committee’s Announced:

Conference for HB 256: Jones 50, Elmer, Otto

Conference for HB 199: Dugger, Diehl. Conway 10

House Bills for Third Reading:

House Bill 717 — This omnibus bill dealing out of the Children and Families and Persons with Disabilities committee had no floor debate and passed by overwhelming margin immediately.

—-

Monday, May 13 Updates

6:45 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

The House Adjourned under the rules until 10 a.m., Tuesday, May 14.

Rules and Education Committee’s will be held immediately following adjournment.

House Bill 717 — An omnibus bill dealing with children and families, this bill contains language pertaining to new TANF fund regulations, neighborhood youth development programs, increases penalties for statuary and forcible rape, modifies language dealing with the adoption of children in state custody, and includes several other underlying bills. The bill was perfected by a wide margin.

House Bill 727 — This bill, an omnibus bill dealing with disabilities, deals with accessible parking, service animals, DESE regulations for students with disabilities, changes criminal charges for the death or injury of a service dog, comprehensive day rehab for people with brain injuries, and other provisions. The bill was perfected by a wide margin.

6 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Conference Committee Reports:

Senate Bill 34 — This bill requires the Division of Workers Compensation to develop and maintain a database with all workers compensation claims that is searchable by an employee name and social security number. The bill went largely unopposed as member from both sides called the final language a compromise.

The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

House Bills With Senate Substitutes:

House Bill 256 — The House refused to accept Senate Amendments on the bill and requested a conference on the bill.

House Bill 400 — This bill dealing with the administration of RU-486, an abortion inducing drug, didn’t pass the floor without passionate debate from both sides. The bill requires the drug be taken in the presence of the physician who prescribed it. Current standard medical practice is to take the first pill in a medical facility and to take the second dose at home after a period of time has passed.

  • Supporters: They claim the bill does not deal with abortion, but with protecting women. Members supporting the bill say that doctors don’t always use the proper procedure to prescribe this medication, particularly in the case of tele-medicine. Members accused Democrats of turning the issue into an abortion debate and forgoing women’s well being.
  • Detractors: They say the bill flies in the face of the American College of Gynecology, which recommends the second RU-486 dose be taken at home. Democrats said supporters of the bill weren’t qualified to make this decision, and that medical professionals — and not state statute — should determine the administration of medication.
  • The bill passed by a vote of 115-39.

House Bill 199 — An omnibus elections bill, which also has language sought by North Kansas City Hospital, was sent to conference committee.

House Bills with Messages:

  • Senate Bill 77 — The House refused to recede from its position on a bill dealing with youth neighborhood development programs. The bill will go to conference.
  • Senate Bill 57 — A bill dealing with, nuisance abatement ordinances and hospital districts also places caps on civil actions against mining operations will be sent to conference.
  • Senate Bill 42 — A bill dealing largely with sheriffs was sent to conference as well. The bill places caps on sheriff salaries and changes certain laws relating to repayment of county jail debt and eligibility for the election of the office of sheriff.
  • Senate Bill 90 — A bill dealing with primary and regular elections for city council in third and fourth class counties was sent to conference.
  • Senate Bill 33 — The House refused to recede from it’s position on a bill dealing with the rights of the mentally disabled, and the bill was sent to conference.
  • Senate Bill 327 — A bill making changes to the law allowing for electronic monitoring of individuals pending trial for certain kinds of crime, which had concerns from the senate related to the title of the legislation, failed a vote to recede from the House position and was sent to conference.

Conference Committees appointed:

  • Conference for SB 33 — Grisamore, Neely, Newman.
  • Conference for SB42 — Jones 50, Houghton, Colona,
  • Conference for SB57 — Engler, Keeny, Roorda.
  • Conference for SB77 — Allen, Flannigan, Colona,
  • Conference for SB90 — Dugger, Hough, Swearingen

5 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 127 — This bill authorizes a statewide dental delivery system under the MO Healthnet.

  • Amendments were offered by Rep. Barnes and Rep. Caleb Jones, both were well received and there was no opposition on the floor. There was no floor debate.

Senate Bill 161 — This bill, which deals with certain health insurance policies, was originally designed to require an actuary analysis to study the cost impact of mandating health insurance coverage of eating disorders. Sponsor Rep. Rick Stream, whose daughter passed away due to complications from an eating disorder, and said on the floor that a lot was added to the language in committee.

  • Amendments: An amendment offered by Rep. Burlison to establish parameters that navigators are not to be entering into private health insurance was briefly challenged by a point of order from Democratic Rep. Jeff Roorda. The point of order was not well taken.Rep. Roorda wasn’t done, and offered a second point of order on an amendment to Burlison’s amendment, though like the ones from earlier today, it was not well taken.The bill eventually passed, with a single amendment, with more than 100 votes.
  • An Emergency clause vote, which was so close that the voting board remained open for more than 10 minutes while supporters tried to wrangle all 109 votes needed. The Clause eventually got to 109, and was officially adopted.

Conference Committee Reports:

  • Senate Bill 23 — This bill was originally drawn rather narrowly, but the final language out of conference featured a Use Tax, a Transient Guest Tax, a Freight line tax and language establishing a Joplin Disaster Area TIF. The bill also includes legislation needed to fix problems with the Kansas City public school teachers retirement fund.The bill is significant for what was left out as well. Language was removed in conference dealing with data centers, instituting an Angel tax incentive program and Land Assemblage credits.Conference Committee member from the Minority Rep. John Rizzo said he would support the bill, but not before slamming the Senate and the House for allowing such “important, key provisions,” to be drawn out.The bill passed with more than 100 votes.

Senate Bill 106 — A bill dealing with veterans moved quickly through the house with not a single vote in opposition. The bill dealt largely with allowing education credits awarded by the military to be recognized by higher education institutions in the state. There was no opposition.

Senate Bill 117 — A second veterans bill, dealing with residency regulations for attending school for active and former military, moved rapidly on the floor with very little debate and no votes in opposition.

4 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 205 — This bill requires that anyone over the age of 15 in state foster care or youth services be given a tour of a local university, college or technical school before they graduate out of their respective programs. Sponsor Eric Burlison, R-Springfield, said that it had the potential to “drastically change,” the lives of children under state care and promote more higher education participation. The bill had support on both sides of the aisle and no significant opposition.

  • Passed.

Senate Bill 69 — This bill, a relatively small item according to sponsor Stanely Cox of Sedalia, allows for the Department of Social Services to make certain changes to administrative or judicial orders relating to child support.

Amendments:

  • Offered by Rep. Fitzpatrick, R-Monett, offered an amendment that would exempt third class counties from acquiring licenses for child care facilities.The amendment caused much more controversy than the underlying bill. Several Democrats said that exempting childcare facilities from licensing in third class counties would ultimately result in less child safety and less protections. Democrats on the floor said that safety regulations were more important in rural areas where there is already less money for local services. The lengthy debate, more than 20 minutes on the amendment, slowed down the body.The amendment was ultimately defeated by a wide margin, receiving less than 60 votes.
  • An amendment offered by Rep. May was shot down immediately by a point of order, as it was designed to address certain parts of the criminal code and found to go “beyond the scope of the bill.”

The full bill was truly agreed to and finally passed by a vote of 152-4.

Senate Bill 208 — This bill raising the the age limit for when a child may enter state foster care passed with no significant opposition and no debate on the floor.

3 p.m. floor update (By Collin Reischman)

Senate Bill 357 — This bill, which modifies provisions related to the liens for mechanic’s rental machinery and equipment. There was no significant opposition and the bill was third read.

Senate Bill 58 — Rep. Kevin Engler, R-Farmington, sponsored a bill allowing ordinances from the city of Farmington to go to a vote of the people. The bill was amended twice successfully and quickly on the floor before it was third read and passed by the House. There was no significant opposition.

Conference Committees Announced:

Senate Bill 229 — This bill came at the request of the Department of Mental Health and adds certain offenses to the list of offenses that disqualify employees from being given a “direct care,” job. Some of the new disqualifying crimes include alcohol related offenses and terrorism. There was no significant opposition and the bill was truly agreed to and finally passed.

Senate Bill 29 — Commonly referred to as “paycheck protection,” by supporters, this bill would require the annual written consent of a public employee union member in order to allow their union to deduct dues. The act also would stop unions from using any deduction for political purposes without the amount and the usage expressly agreed to annually by the employee. Detractors, who refer to the legislation as “paycheck deception,” were largely from the Democratic side of the aisle.

  • Supporters: They claim the bill protects the 1stamendment right of citizens to affiliate with any political organization they choose without repercussions. Many supporters stated that unions marginalize or otherwise punish employees who do not agree with their political positions.
  • Detractors: They claim this issue simply does not exist. Many public employee unions already have an opt-out option available for any members that do not want dues collected for political purposes, and that the bill is aimed at weakening unions that often vote for Democrats.

The bill was truly agreed to and finally passed by a vote of 85-69.

Senate Bill 205 — This bill requires that anyone over the age of 15 in state foster care or youth services be given a tour of a local university, college or technical school before they graduate out of their respective programs. Sponsor Eric Burlison, R-Springfield, said that it had the potential to “drastically change,” the lives of children under state care and promote more higher education participation. The bill had support on both sides of the aisle and no significant opposition. This bill is currently being discussed on the floor.