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Senate Hourly Updates: Veto Session Edition

  

8 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Messages from the House

Order of business of vetoed House bills

  • HB 1414 (Munzlinger) – Prohibits certain agricultural data from being subject to public disclosure laws
    • Opponents say this would damage the tenets of the Sunshine law
    • Some dissention from Schaaf
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 23-7.
  • HB 1432 (Wieland) – Modifies the law relating to administrative leave for public employees
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 23-7.
  • HB 1870 (Pearce) – Modifies provisions relating to the collection of moneys by public entities
    • “Big Government, Get Off My Back” Act
    • Senate fails to override governor’s veto 18-12.
  • HB 1976 (Munzlinger) – Modifies provisions relating to motor vehicle services
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 27-3.

Resolutions

Recess until 8:45

7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • SB 641 (Schatz) – Creates an income tax deduction for payments received as part of a program that compensates agricultural producers for losses from disaster or emergency – continued
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 24-6.

Recess until 7:25 p.m.

Reconvened 7:30

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • SB 874 (Emery) – Modifies provisions relating to the collateral source rule and provides that parties may introduce evidence of the actual cost, rather than the value, of the medical care rendered
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 24-6.
  • SB 994 (Munzlinger) – Modifies provisions relating to alcohol
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 24-6.
  • HB 2030 (Silvey) – Creates a tax deduction for employee stock ownership plans
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 26-4.
  • HB 1713 (Emery) – Modifies provisions relating to regulation of water systems
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 25-5.
  • HB 1763 (Wieland) – Changes the laws regarding workers’ compensation large deductible policies issued by an insurer
    • Vetoed because of a drafting error. Wrong “insured”
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 25-5.

6 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • SB 656 (Munzlinger) – Modifies provisions relating to county sheriffs, self defense, unlawful use of weapons, and concealed carry permits – continued
    • Chappelle-Nadal believes people of color who do adhere to this law and carry concealed without a permit would be unreasonably feared.
    • Holsman: “I want moderation. I want common sense. In the middle where the centrists are, where the moderates are that’s where you’re going to find things that help society.”
    • Democrats continue filibuster.
    • Privileged motion after two hours of debate for a motion to previous question.
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 24-6.
  • SB 641 (Schatz) – Creates an income tax deduction for payments received as part of a program that compensates agricultural producers for losses from disaster or emergency
    • Debate continues

5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • SB 656 (Munzlinger) – Modifies provisions relating to county sheriffs, self defense, unlawful use of weapons, and concealed carry permits – continued
    • Curls highlights “stand your ground” provision in the bill. “These stand your ground laws have been very controversial, they’ve led to questionable cases involving deadly force.”
    • Democrats have dominated discussion so far as they did with HB 1631, looking to put off vote for as long as possible.
    • Dixon to Munzlinger about the gun docket law offered by Kansas City. “Our actions have consequences, and we have to take responsibility for those actions… There was no vote on a gun docket bill that we could have done. A lot of good stuff failed because we brought [SB 656] up and we threatened to PQ.”
    • Dixon: “I just want to point out the reason that bill did not come up for a vote was this particular bill which came at the last moment and many of us were kind of blindsided at which this bill came at us in the last moment…“Wouldn’t it be better for us to bring things before this body a little bit sooner than the last day of session and then do a previous question motion?”

4 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • HB 1631 (Alferman) – Modifies provisions of law relating to voter identification – continued
    • Nasheed: In the Franks-Hubbard ruling it clearly states that no evidence could be presented of voter fraud.
    • Some testy exchanges between Kraus and Nasheed.
    • Nasheed: “What you’re trying to do is weaken the Democratic base. This is a systematic move around the country… and it’s being shut down in other parts of the country.”
    • Kraus: “I think we are not doing all we can to protect the process.” “We’re in the ninth inning with two outs, and it’s time to vote.”
    • Privileged motion offered by Kraus to move to previous question. Succeeds.
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 24-7.
  • SB 656 (Munzlinger) – Modifies provisions relating to county sheriffs, self defense, unlawful use of weapons, and concealed carry permits
    • Big gun bill, the contentious one. Proponents say it guarantees Second Amendment rights while opponents argue measures that would guarantee concealed carry without a permit is dangerous.
    • Munzlinger: “There have been a lot of misconceptions about this bill… It allows the law-abiding citizens of the state of Missouri the right to carry concealed.”
    • Holsman to Munzlinger: “I went through an eight-hour course. I shot my 120 rounds. I got my concealed carry permit. It was not that difficult. But in that class I learned a tremendous amount of things.”

3 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • HB 1631 (Alferman) – Modifies provisions of law relating to voter identification – continued
    • Chappelle-Nadal now speaking, long speech and possible filibuster
    • Dixon to Kraus: Dixon reads off the list of documents that would be offered free of charge by the state to obtain a photo ID. “We’re going another step toward ensuring there is no back-door poll tax.”
    • Dixon: “How does my vote count if other people are voting multiple times in my district.”
    • Kraus calls legislation “common sense”

2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • SB 608 (Sater) – Modifies provisions relating to health care – continued
    • Democrats move the conversation to discuss the lack of Medicaid expansion
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 24-7

Messages from the House

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • HB 1631 (Alferman) – Modifies provisions of law relating to voter identification
    • House has already overridden the governor’s veto
    • Bill would be the logistical side of a constitutional amendment on the ballot this November.
    • Photo voter ID has been a contentious issue. Republicans argue it protects the integrity of the elections process while Democrats argue it disenfranchises Democratic voting blocs like minorities and that it would not actually prevent fraud.
    • Kraus is the Senate sponsor for the bill. He and Alferman have worked a lot on this measure.
    • Schaaf: “I cannot imagine a single person who is going to be disenfranchised as a result of this legislation.”
    • Kraus: “I think it’s time we move into the 21st century and make sure we can identify people at the polls.”
    • Kraus: “I believe when you look at absentee fraud, voting in the wrong district fraud, those are examples of fraud we have detected. Impersonation fraud, you cannot detect.”
    • Kraus: “People are trying to change the outcome of elections.”
    • Chappelle-Nadal brings up alleged absentee fraud in House District 78 election between Rep. Penny Hubbard and Bruce Franks and irregularities in her own failed bit for Congressman Lacy Clay’s seat. However, “It has nothing to do with the voter ID.”

1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • SB 844 (Parson) – Modifies provisions relating to livestock trespass liability – continued
    • Parson: “It’s a little disappointing when I hear this is going to be a big advantage for livestock owners across the state.”
    • Holsman: “We have a sledgehammer here, when a scalpel might be more appropriate.”
    • Schatz to Schaaf: Pretty heated debate between the two legislators. Schaaf argues that farmers shouldn’t be blamed for acts of god or criminals destroying a fence, Schaaf says that a victim needs their grievances redressed. Schaaf on if a cow destroys a crop, directed at Parson: “It doesn’t matter if it’s a Hereford or an Angus. The corn is just as flat.”
    • Sifton: “We have insurance to cover these liabilities that arise sometimes due to the liabilities to people or sometimes because they just happen.”
    • Schaaf: “This isn’t a pro-farm bill. This is a pro-cattleman bill.”
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 24-7
  • SB 608 (Sater) – Modifies provisions relating to health care
    • Governor vetoed because he said it would put increased burden on poor families, mainly brings up Medicaid expansion
    • Bill has a lot of provisions. Summary can be read here.
    • Passed 27-5 in February
    • One of the more controversial portions of the bill would involve charging fees to Medicaid patients who miss appointments.
    • Sater: “This is not a mandate that they wuld have to pay a fee. This is optional of the doctor’s office.”
    • Schupp and Walsh oppose the legislation citing possible harm to lower-class communities and families.

12 p.m. to 1 p.m.

Veto session begins

Adoption of Senate Resolution 1

Order of business of vetoed bills

  • SB 1025 (Kraus) – Exempts instructional classes from sales tax
    • Abolishes sales taxes on instructional classes
    • Bill passed unanimously 32-0 on April 14
    • Senate votes to override governor’s veto 29-2
  • SB 844 (Parson) – Modifies provisions relating to livestock trespass liability
    • Would make it so owners of livestock are only liable for damages if they are found to be negligent
    • Schaaf favors the governor’s veto.
    • “We need to read the governor’s veto because it’s so true,” said Schaaf. Citing Nixon’s veto letter: “Regardless of the underlying reason for escape, Missouri law properly renders liability for damages to the owner of the animal.”
    • As a result of that negligence the animals get out and damage your property.
    • Holsman questions Parson.
    • Parson: Schaaf wouldn’t know the difference between a Hereford and an Angus.